Six Things Product Packaging Must Accomplish

Anyone who has ever tried to sell a product can attest to how difficult it can be to get their product in front of customers and convert them to make the purchase. It is one of those concepts that sounds incredibly simple on paper yet turns out to be incredibly difficult when it is applied to the real world. Indeed, there are many studies showing that the packaging alone can make a significant difference in sales even if the product itself is totally unchanged. Continue reading…


Simplified Guide to IATA’s Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR)

If you have dealt with dangerous goods (also commonly referred to as hazardous materials) in any shape or form, you have probably heard about the Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) set forward by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). They are known for releasing an updated version of their IATA DGR manual that is considered to be the “global reference for shipping dangerous goods by air and the only standard recognized by airlines.” Continue reading…


Intents of Placards and Labels on a Storage Container

Whenever you receive a container, you can expect to find numerous labels. There’s usually the address of the sender and the recipient, along with some postal markup to indicate if the package was submitted normally or delivered through an express system by request.

If you happen to work with materials that are somewhat dangerous, you are going to see several additional markups that contain information about the product itself, the dangers it may cause to human health, and how it should be properly handled. Continue reading…


Guidance Document – Battery Powered Cargo Tracking Devices / Data Loggers

INTRODUCTION

Many shipments of time and temperature sensitive products including food, pharmaceutical,medical devices, vaccines, and industrial chemicals such as chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) slurries, adhesives, and sealants contain, or have attached to the package(s) and/or overpack(s) small battery-powered tracking devices / data loggers. Most of these devices use lithium metal or lithium ion cells or batteries as a power source.

Lithium cells and batteries are classified as dangerous goods and therefore must meet all of the applicable provisions of the Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) when shipped by air. This applies regardless of whether the lithium cells or batteries are shipped as cargo in their own right or whether the lithium cells or batteries are installed in a small device such as a data logger that is placed inside or attached to packages of cargo. In addition, to be permitted in transport all lithium cell and battery types must have passed the applicable tests set out in Subsection 38.3 of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria.

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on:

1. complying with provisions applicable to the transport by air of lithium batteries as set out inthe DGR when lithium battery powered data loggers are contained in cargo; and

2. recommendations with respect to the use of battery-powered devices that are active during transport. The recommendations for active devices are taken from FAA Advisory Circular AC 21.91-1C, primarily the recommendations in Section 8 of the AC, which relate to active devices carried in the aircraft cargo compartment.

This document is based on the provisions set out in the 2017-2018 Edition of the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Technical Instructions) and the 58th Edition of the IATA DGR, Section II of Packing Instructions (PI) 967 and PI 970.

The provisions of the DGR with respect to lithium batteries may also be found in the IATA Lithium Battery Shipping Guidelines (LBSG). In addition to the content from the DGR, the LBSG also has additional classification flowcharts and detailed packing and documentation examples for lithium batteries.

Information on the DGR and LBSG can be found here:

http://www.iata.org/publications/dgr/Pages/index.aspx

http://www.iata.org/publications/store/Pages/lithium-battery-shipping-guidelines.aspx

REQUIREMENTS FOR LITHIUM CELLS AND BATTERIES

The extent to which the lithium cells or batteries are regulated as dangerous goods depends on:

(a) the lithium metal content for lithium metal cells or batteries; or

(b) the Watt-hour (Wh) rating for lithium ion cells or batteries.

Fully Regulated Lithium Batteries

Lithium metal cells with a lithium metal content exceeding 1 g and lithium metal batteries with a lithium metal content exceeding 2 g.

Lithium ion cells with a Watt-hour rating exceeding 20 Wh and lithium ion batteries with a Watt-hour rating exceeding 100 Wh.

Devices that contain fully regulated lithium cells or batteries are subject to all of the provisions of the DGR, which includes:

(a) dangerous goods training. All persons involved in the preparation and shipping must have completed appropriate dangerous goods training and must attend recurrent dangerous goods training at intervals not exceeding 24 months;

(b) marks and labels on packages. All packages must be marked with the name and address of the shipper and consignee, the UN number and proper shipping name. Packages must also bear the Class 9 lithium battery hazard label, except that until 31 December 2018 the standard Class 9 miscellaneous hazard label may be used;

(c) documentation. The consignment must be correctly described on a Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods.

Excepted Lithium Batteries

Where the lithium cells or batteries have a lithium metal content of 1 g or less for cells or 2 g or less for batteries or for lithium ion the cells have a Watt-hour rating of 20 Wh or less or batteries are 100 Wh or less, then they are not subject to all of the provisions of the DGR.

Lithium cells or batteries that fit within these limits are subject to Section II of the applicable lithium battery packing instructions in the DGR. Each package that contains such cells or batteries, including those installed in devices, must not contain more than 5 kg net weight of lithium cells or batteries.

Cargo Tracking Devices/Data Loggers Containing Excepted Lithium cells or Batteries

Packages containing lithium batteries installed in equipment such as a data logger must bear the lithium battery mark as shown in Figure 7.1.C of the IATA DGR, see Figure 1. The border of the label must have red diagonal hatchings 5 mm in width with text and symbols in black on a white or contrasting background. The lithium battery mark may be printed directly on the outer packaging provided that there is sufficient contrast between the elements of the lithium battery mark and the colour of the packaging material. The minimum dimensions are 120 mm wide x 110 mm high.

Exceptions:

1. the lithium battery mark is not required on packages where the data loggers are powered by only button (coin) cells (regardless of the quantity of data loggers in a particular package or the number of packages in a consignment);

2. the lithium battery mark is not required on packages where there are no more than 4 cells or 2 batteries contained in equipment in each package and there are no more than two packages in the consignment.

This means that if the cargo tracking device or data logger is powered by other than lithium button (coin) cells and there are more than two packages containing tracking devices/data loggers, then the lithium battery mark must be applies to all packages in the consignment that contain tracking devices/data loggers.

Figure 1 – Lithium Battery Mark

figure 1

* Place for UN number(s), i.e. UN 3090, UN 3091, UN 3480 and/or UN 3481, as applicable

                                                      ** Place for telephone number

Note:

The lithium battery handling label as shown in the 57th edition of the DGR, see Figure 2, may continue to be used until 31 December 2018.

Figure 2 – Lithium Battery Handling Label
figure 2

* Place for “Lithium ion battery” and/or “Lithium metal battery”

Where the packages are of dimensions such that they cannot bear the full size lithium battery mark, the mark dimensions may be reduced to 105 mm wide × 74 mm high. The design specifications otherwise remain the same.

The telephone number on the lithium battery mark (or lithium battery handling label) should be that of a person knowledgeable about the shipment but is not intended to be for the purposes of obtaining immediate emergency response guidance, and is therefore not required to be monitored at all times while the package is in transit. It is acceptable for the number to be monitored during the company’s normal business hours in order to provide product-specific information relative to the shipment. However, it also is acceptable to use an emergency response, 24-hour phone number on the lithium battery mark.

Where a consignment includes packages bearing the lithium battery mark, the words “Lithium ion batteries in compliance with Section II of PI 967” or “Lithium metal batteries in compliance with Section II of PI 970”, as applicable must be included on the air waybill, when an air waybill is used. The information should be shown in the “Nature and Quantity of Goods” box of the air waybill.

Note:

A Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods is not required.

Shippers of excepted lithium batteries are not subject to the formal dangerous goods training requirements set out in DGR 1.5, however, persons preparing such shipments must be provided with “adequate instruction” as described in DGR 1.6.

The following is offered as a starting point for an employer on what could be considered as being adequate instruction:

1. The employer must identify the different configurations of lithium batteries that they ship, i.e. lithium batteries and/or lithium batteries packed with equipment and/or lithium batteries contained in equipment; lithium metal batteries and/or lithium ion batteries.

2. The employer must document the procedures that apply to the configurations and battery types that they ship as determined in 1, above.

3. The procedures should be written up as a clear work instructions or other form of information that is available to all employees responsible for the preparation of lithium battery shipments.

4. All employees that are involved in the process of preparing lithium battery shipments must be taken through the procedure to ensure that they understand and can demonstrate the correct application of documented procedures for the packing, labelling, marking and documentations requirements, as applicable to their job function.

5. A record must be maintained that identifies each applicable employee and the date(s) that this instruction was provided.

6. Employees should be given periodic refresher, or at least demonstrate that they remain “adequately” instructed on how to perform the task. This should be done at least every two years or whenever the procedure is revised, or regulations are changed, whichever is sooner.

7. Companies that are involved in reverse logistics, i.e. arranging for returns of lithium batteries, lithium batteries packed with equipment or lithium batteries contained in equipment must develop a clear instruction for consumers on the process to be followed for returning products. This instruction must include packaging materials and lithium battery marks, as necessary. The instruction must also include the transport method and mode of transport to be followed; this must include a clear statement on applicable prohibitions.

RECOMMENDATIONS ON SHIPPING ACTIVE DEVICES

Portable electronic devices (PED) such as data loggers and cargo tracking devices, that are designed to remain active throughout their entire transport from the shipper to the consignee, including when on board an aircraft, have the potential to interfere with aircraft navigation or communication systems.

Therefore, manufacturers of PED, users of PED and the operator (airline) are only permitted to place in or attach to cargo and to carry PED that the operator of the aircraft has determined will not interfere with the safe operation of that aircraft. The recommendations set out in this document are one means, but not the only means, of complying with the applicable operational regulations pertaining to the operation of PED.

This section applies to PED that are designed for use on aircraft in locations inaccessible to the flight crew during flight. Because this class of PED cannot be turned off manually in the event of an emergency, the device manufacturers and aircraft operators must ensure certain design and operational considerations are addressed. The operator must ensure that these PED meet the following criteria prior to allowing use on aircraft:

1. the cargo tracking device/data logger meets the RF radiated emissions limits defined in RTCA/DO-160, Environmental Conditions and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment, Section 21, Category H during all modes of operation. Testing of the device must include any peripheral devices that will be used with the device during normal operations. Typically, peripherals include external sensors or associated wiring. For additional Guidance, refer to RTCA/DO-357, User Guide: Supplement to DO-160G.

2. the device is designed with a minimum of two independent means to turn off completely, turn off cellular or mobile functions, or a combination of both when airborne. These independent methods must use different sources to identify flight. For example, a cargo tracking device designed to sense rapid altitude changes and acceleration to turn off cellular transmissions is an acceptable design feature that meets the requirement. Redundant sources of the same information, such as two vertical accelerometers, would not be an acceptable design.

3. the device manufacturer substantiated data includes:

(a) pictures of the device and any peripherals,

(b) product label,

(c) operational description of device and peripherals,

(d) manufacturer statement of strict design and production controls, and

(e) if device contains a lithium battery, battery design standard and relevant battery qualification documentation (e.g., TSO-C142a, Non-Rechargeable Lithium Cells or Batteries, dated August 7, 2006, approval; RTCA/DO-311, Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Rechargeable Lithium Battery Systems, dated March 13, 2008, qualification report, maintenance requirements and process and procedures to address the movement of defective devices, including damaged or defective batteries).

4. the device must not be capable of generating a dangerous evolution of heat.

5. the device must not be capable of emitting disturbing signals, such as buzzing alarms or strobe lights, during transport.

Manufacturers of cargo tracking devices/data loggers should undertake all of the required testing of their devices so that they can satisfy the aircraft operator that the devices comply with the recommendations above. It is recommended that the device manufacturers coordinate with the aircraft operators so that a list of approved devices is available to users of the devices.

It is the operator that retains the responsibility to approve the use and carriage of PED in cargo and it is the operator that will issue any authorisation or approval on the use of PED on their aircraft.

It is recommended that manufacturers of PED that are intended to be placed into, or attached to cargo make contact with operators in advance so that the approval / authorisation can be coordinated. This will avoid the need for multiple individual shippers to seek approval / authorisation for the same device.

DEFINITIONS

Lithium Battery – The term “lithium battery” refers to a family of batteries with different chemistries, comprising many types of cathodes and electrolytes. For the purposes of the DGR they are separated into:

Lithium metal batteries. Are generally primary (non-rechargeable) batteries that have lithium metal or lithium compounds as an anode. Also included within lithium metal are lithium alloy batteries. Lithium metal batteries are generally used to power devices such as watches, calculators, cameras, temperature data loggers, car key fobs and defibrillators.

Note:

Lithium metal batteries packed by themselves (not contained in or packed with equipment) (Packing Instruction 968) are forbidden for transport as cargo on passenger aircraft) unless shipped under exemption issued by all States concerned, see Special Provision A201.

 

figure 1.1

Figure 1 – Example of Lithium Metal Cells and Batteries

Lithium-ion batteries (sometimes abbreviated Li-ion batteries) are a secondary (rechargeable) battery where the lithium is only present in an ionic form in the electrolyte. Also included within the category of lithium-ion batteries are lithium polymer batteries. Lithium-ion batteries are generally used to power devices such as mobile telephones, laptop computers, tablets, power tools and e-bikes.

figure 1.2

Figure 2 – Example of Lithium Ion Cells and Batteries

Note:

Lithium ion batteries packed by themselves (Packing Instruction 965) (not contained in or packed with equipment):

(a) must be shipped at a state of charge (SoC) not exceeding 30% of their rated design capacity. Cells and/or batteries at a SoC of greater than 30% may only be shipped with the approval of the State of Origin and the State of the Operator under the written conditions established by those authorities, see Special Provision A331; and

(b) are forbidden for transport as cargo on passenger aircraft unless shipped under exemption issued by all States concerned, see Special Provision A201.

The technical definition of a battery and cell, as indicated in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, is as follows:

Battery means two or more cells which are electrically connected together and fitted with devices necessary for use, for example, case, terminals, marking and protective devices. Units which have two or more cells that are commonly referred to as “battery packs”, “modules” or “battery assemblies” having the primary function of providing a source of power to another piece of equipment are for the purposes of the UN Model Regulations and this guidance document treated as batteries. See definitions for “cell” and “single cell battery”. (See also “Power Banks”)

Button cell or battery means a round small cell or battery when the overall height is less than the diameter.

Cell means a single encased electrochemical unit (one positive and one negative electrode) which exhibits a voltage differential across its two terminals. Under the UN Model Regulations, UN Manual of Tests and Criteria and this guidance, to the extent the encased electrochemical unit meets the definition of “cell” herein, it is a “cell”, not a “battery”, regardless of whether the unit is termed a “battery” or a “single cell battery” outside of the UN Model Regulations, the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria and this guidance.

Consignment, one or more packages of dangerous goods accepted by an operator (airline) from one shipper at one time and at one address, receipted for in one lot and moving to one consignee at one destination address.

Operator, a person, organisation or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in an aircraft operation.

Overpack, an enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages and to form one handling unit for convenience of handling and stowage. Dangerous goods packages contained in the overpack must be properly packed, marked, labelled and in proper condition as required by the DGR. (A Unit Load Device is not included in this definition).

Package, (for dangerous goods) the complete product of the packing operation consisting of the packaging and contents prepared for transport.

Packaging, one or more receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacles to perform their containment and other safety functions and to ensure compliance with the minimum packing requirements of the DGR.

Unit Load Device (ULD), any type of freight container, aircraft container, aircraft pallet with a net, or aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo.

Note:

An overpack is not included in this definition.

Watt-hour Rating, expressed in Watt-hours (Wh), the Watt-hour rating of a lithium cell or battery is calculated by multiplying the rated capacity in ampere-hours by the nominal voltage.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Part 1 – Questions Related to Definitions

A. What are the various types of lithium batteries?

Lithium batteries fall into two broad classifications; lithium metal batteries and lithium ion batteries. Lithium metal batteries are generally non-rechargeable and contain metallic lithium. Lithium ion batteries contain lithium which is only present in an ionic form in the electrolyte and are rechargeable.

Within these two broad classifications there are many different chemistries. For example within lithium ion batteries there are lithium polymer, lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), lithium air to name a few.

 

B. What is the difference between a lithium cell and a lithium battery?

A lithium cell is a single encased electrochemical unit consisting of one positive and one negative electrode that exhibits a voltage differential across the two terminals. A lithium battery is two or more cells electrically connected. A single cell battery is considered a cell and not a battery for the purposes of the limitations set out in the DGR.

Note: Units that are commonly referred to as “battery packs” or “power banks” having the primary function of providing a source of power to another piece of equipment are for the purposes of these Regulations treated as batteries. Refer to the section on Definitions for complete details.

 

C. How are component cells connected to form a battery?

Cells in batteries may be connected in parallel, in series, or in a combination of the two. When cells are connected in series, the voltage of the battery increases but the capacity in ampere-hours (Ah) does not change. By contrast, when cells are connected in parallel the capacity in ampere-hours of the battery (Ah) increases but the voltage stays the same.

 

D. How do I determine the watt-hour rating for a particular lithium ion battery?

The watt-hour (Wh) rating is a measure by which lithium ion batteries are regulated. Section I Lithium ion batteries manufactured after 31 December 2011 and Section IB and Section II Lithium ion batteries manufactured after 1 January 2009 are required to be marked with the watt-hour rating.

You can also arrive at the number of watt-hours your battery provides if you know the battery’s nominal voltage (V) and capacity in ampere-hours (Ah):

Ah x V = Wh

Note:

If only the milliampere-hours (mAh) are marked on the battery then divide that number by 1000 to get ampere-hours (Ah) (i.e. 4400 mAh / 1000 = 4.4. Ah).

Most lithium ion batteries marketed to consumers are below 100 watt-hours. If you are unsure of the watt-hour rating of your lithium ion battery, contact the manufacturer.

 

E. What is a button cell battery?

A button cell battery is a round small cell where the overall height is less than the diameter. Button cells are often referred to as “coin” cells.

 

Part 2 – Questions Related to Design Type Testing Provisions

A. Where can I find requirements related to testing of battery design types?

The UN Manual of Tests and Criteria sets out specific tests that must be conducted on each lithium cell or battery design type. Each test is intended to either simulate a common transportation occurrence such as vibration or changes in altitude or to test the integrity of a cell or battery. You may obtain a copy of these testing requirements via the following website: http://www.unece.org/trans/danger/publi/manual/manual_e.html.

 

B. What constitutes a design change requiring renewed design type testing?

The following provisions are taken from the 6th revised edition of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, paragraph 38.3.2.2.

A cell or battery that differs from a tested design by:

(a) For primary cells and batteries, a change of more than 0.1 g or 20% by mass, whichever is greater, to the cathode, to the anode, or to the electrolyte;

(b) For rechargeable cells and batteries, a change in Watt-hours of more than 20% or an increase in voltage of more than 20%; or

(c) A change that would materially affect the test results.

shall be considered a new type and shall be subjected to the required tests.

Note: the type of change that might be considered to differ from a tested type, such that it might lead to a failure of any of the test results, may include, but is not limited to:

(a) A change in the material of the anode, the cathode, the separator or the electrolyte;

(b) A change of protective devices, including the hardware and software;

(c) A change of safety design in cells or batteries, such as a venting valve;

(d) A change in the number of component cells;

(e) A change in connection mode of component cells;

(f) For batteries which are to be tested according to T.4 with a peak acceleration less than 150 gn, a change in the mass which could adversely impact the result of the T.4 test and lead to a failure.

In the event that a cell or battery type does not meet one or more of the test requirements, steps shall be taken to correct the deficiency or deficiencies that caused the failure before such a cell or battery type is retested.

 

C. Who is responsible for testing lithium cells and batteries?

It is the manufacturer of the lithium cell type to have the type tested against the applicable provisions set out in Subsection 38.3 of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria. In addition where lithium cells are combined together to form a battery, the manufacturer of the lithium battery must have the battery type tested against the applicable provisions set out in Subsection 38.3 of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria.

Manufacturers of devices that incorporate lithium cells or batteries should seek confirmation from the manufacturer or supplier of the lithium cells or batteries that the cell or battery type has passed the applicable UN 38.3 tests.

 

Part 3 – Questions related to Packaging and Transport Provisions

A. If I have smaller packages, can I use a smaller lithium mark?

Where the packages are of dimensions such that they cannot bear the full size lithium battery mark, the mark dimensions may be reduced to 105 mm wide × 74 mm high. The design specifications remain otherwise the same.

 

B. When is a lithium battery mark not required on the package?

A lithium battery mark is not required for packages prepared in accordance with Section II of PI 967 or PI 970 containing only button cell batteries installed in equipment (including circuit boards) or consignments of two packages or less where each package contains no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment.

Note:

The Air Waybill is only required to contain the statements “Lithium [ion or metal] batteries in compliance with Section II of PI9XX” when the lithium battery mark is affixed to the package(s).

 

C. Section II in Packing Instructions 967 and 970 states that “the lithium battery mark is not required on consignments of two packages or less where each package contains no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment.” What is the intent of this provision?

This provision is to require, where there are more than two packages in the consignment, that each package bears the lithium battery mark, and therefore the air waybill has the compliance statement e.g. “Lithium [ion or metal] batteries in compliance with Section II of PI 9xx [67 or 70]”.

The provision continues to allow for small consignments of one or two packages containing no more than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment per package to move without the lithium battery mark and therefore without the compliance statement on the air waybill.

Note:

A consignment is one or more packages of dangerous goods accepted by an operator (airline) from one shipper at one time and at one address, receipted for in one lot and moving to one consignee at one destination address.

 

D. For the purposes of the lithium battery packing instructions, what is considered the “package”?

The package is the complete product of the packing operation that satisfies the requirements of the packing instruction and in a manner ready to be presented for transport (shipper/consignee information, hazard communication, net quantity of lithium batteries is within limits). The package may contain multiple batteries or pieces of equipment provided the limitations set out in the applicable packing instruction are not exceeded. The package must be marked and labelled as required by the packing instruction.

A “package” may contain multiple boxes that are all placed inside an outer packaging to form a discrete unit for transport provided that the total net quantity of lithium cells or batteries inside the “package” does not exceed 5 kg. Or, one or more packages may then be placed into an overpack for ease of handling or transport purposes. When an overpack is used, the package marks and labels must be duplicated on the overpack unless the marks and labels required on individual packages are visible, or are not required by the packing instruction (i.e. not more than 4 cells or 2 batteries when contained in equipment and no more than two packages in the consignment).

 

E. Can a single lithium battery mark be used to identify that both lithium metal and lithium ion batteries are contained inside the package?

Yes. The mark may bear all applicable UN numbers, e.g. UN 3091, UN 3481, to identify that the package contains lithium metal batteries packed with, or contained in equipment and lithium ion batteries packed with, or contained in equipment.

 

F. What are the requirements for the telephone number on the lithium battery mark?

The telephone number should be of a person knowledgeable about the shipment but is not intended to be for the purposes of obtaining immediate emergency response guidance, and is therefore not required to be monitored at all times that the package is in transit. It is acceptable for the number to be monitored during the company’s normal business hours in order to provide product-specific information relative to the shipment. However, it also is acceptable to use an emergency response, 24-hour phone number on the lithium battery mark.

 

G. Is it acceptable to apply the lithium battery mark to packages that contain only button cells installed in equipment?

Yes, the allowance not to apply the lithium battery mark to packages containing equipment with only button cells is a relaxation from the regulations, not a prohibition. However, if the package(s) bear the lithium battery mark, then the compliance statement must be included on the air waybill, when an air waybill is used.

 

H. Does IATA require a MSDS or SDS containing the UN test data?

No. IATA does not require a material safety data sheet (MSDS or SDS), or the UN 38.3 test data report as part of the required documentation requirements when offering lithium batteries for transport.

 

I. May lithium battery packages be placed in an overpack in accordance with the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations?

Yes. The overpack may also contain packages of dangerous goods or goods not subject to the Regulations provided there are no packages enclosing different substances which might react dangerously with each other. An overpack must be marked with the word “overpack” and must be labelled with the lithium battery mark (DGR Figure 7.1.C), unless the mark(s) on the package(s) inside the overpack are visible or not required by the Packing Instruction.

In addition, the word “overpack” must be marked on overpacks containing packages transported in accordance with Section I of the applicable Packing Instructions (i.e. bearing the Class 9 lithium battery hazard label).

Note:

For Section II of PI 965 and PI 968 the shipper is limited to one (1) package per consignment (shipment) and no more than one (1) package complying with the requirements of Section II may be placed in an overpack. This overpack may also contain packages prepared in accordance with Section IA and/or IB of PI 965 and/or PI 968 and/or packages of other dangerous goods and/or packages of non-dangerous goods.

 

J. Do the quantity limits shown in the lithium battery packing instructions apply to overpacks containing lithium batteries?

The quantity limits shown in the packing instructions refer to the maximum net weight of lithium batteries in each package. Provided each package remains within the limit specified in the packing instruction, there are no limits specified for an overpack.

Note:

For Section II of PI 965 and PI 968 the shipper is limited to one (1) package per consignment (shipment) and no more than one (1) package complying with the requirements of Section II may be placed in an overpack. This package may be placed in an overpack. This overpack may also contain packages prepared in accordance with Section IA and/or IB of PI 965 and/or PI 968 and/or packages of other dangerous goods and/or packages of non-dangerous goods.

 

K. Can I ship recalled, damaged or non-conforming cells or batteries?

Lithium batteries, identified by the manufacturer as being defective for safety reasons, or that have been damaged, that have the potential of producing a dangerous evolution of heat, fire or short circuit are forbidden for transport by air (e.g. those being returned to the manufacturer for safety reasons). This applies also to lithium cells or batteries installed inside equipment such as mobile phones, laptops or tablets where the devices are subject to recall due to the safety concerns of the lithium cell or battery installed in the device.

Batteries which have some other defective feature (e.g. LEDs not showing charge, incorrect model number on label, or batteries not holding enough charge) could still be shipped by air. Also, laptops being returned may not have a defective battery, it may not meet the needs of the customer, may be defective itself (but not the battery), etc. In these situations air transport would be permitted. The battery or equipment manufacturer should be contacted to determine the appropriate shipping method.

 

L. How do I protect against “inadvertent activation”?

When batteries are contained in equipment, the equipment must be packaged in a manner that prevents unintentional activation or must have an independent means of preventing unintentional activation (e.g., packaging restricts access to activation switch, switch caps or locks, recessed switches, trigger locks, temperature sensitive circuit breakers, etc.). This requirement does not apply to devices which are intentionally active in transport (RFID transmitters, watches, sensors etc.) and which are not capable of generating a quantity of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or personal safety.

 

M. I am shipping perishable and/or pharmaceutical cargo with lithium battery powered temperature or data loggers do I need to follow the Dangerous Goods Regulations?

Yes. All the applicable provisions for lithium batteries will need to be followed by the shipper of such devices, including the limitations for devices that are active during transport.

Note:

The Perishable Cargo Regulations (PCR) and/or Temperature Control Regulations (TCR) also apply to such shipments.

 

N. Does the definition of “consignment” apply to the house air waybill (HAWB) or to the master air waybill (MAWB)?

The use of HAWB or MAWB has no direct relationship to what is a “consignment”. For example a MAWB may have multiple consignments where each of the consignments are from separate shippers, or are from one shipper but to separate consignees, or the MAWB may be just be a single consignment from one shipper to one consignee.

The following limitations apply to consignments:

1. a shipper is not permitted to consign more than one package of Section II, PI 965 or PI 968; and

2. a shipper is not permitted to consign more than two packages of lithium batteries contained in equipment under Section II of PI 967 and PI 970 where there are no more than 4 cells or 2 batteries in the package without the application of the lithium battery handling label (lithium battery mark) on the package.

The objective of these two conditions is to:

1. restrict the number of packages of just lithium batteries that are carried by air that are not subject to the dangerous goods acceptance check and that are not shown on the written information to the pilot-in-command. The intention here is to force shippers of multiple packages to declare these on a Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods and therefore make the consignment subject to the full checks for air transport.

2. require appropriate hazard communication on packages and on the air waybill where a shipper has more than two packages of lithium batteries contained in equipment.

Notes:

1. This does not mean that every retail “package” must bear the lithium battery mark. A shipper may place multiple retail boxes, each containing a lithium battery meeting Section II installed in equipment, into an outer packaging to form the package for air transport. There is no limit on the number of individual retail boxes that can be placed into the outer packaging, except that a “package” must not contain more than 5 kg net weight of lithium batteries. Each such package must bear the lithium battery mark and when an air waybill is used the air waybill must show the applicable compliance statement, e.g. “lithium ion batteries in compliance with section II of PI 967”.

2. Shippers or freight forwarders should not try to split a consignment across multiple air waybills to try to avoid the application of the lithium battery mark where there are more than two packages with lithium batteries contained in equipment under Section II in a consignment.

 

O. Are consignments that contain just Section II lithium batteries subject to a dangerous goods acceptance check by the airline or their ground handling agent?

No, the provisions in the lithium battery packing instructions for Section II do not include the dangerous goods acceptance check as one of the provisions that apply. Any decision on performing an acceptance check of packages that contain Section II lithium batteries is the airlines’. Dangerous goods acceptance are only legally required for fully regulated, Section I lithium batteries.

 

P. I am placing a data logger inside an aircraft unit load device (ULD) to monitor the temperature during transit. Do I need to place a lithium battery mark on the ULD?

No, If the data logger is not inside a package or overpack, the marking provisions of the DGR do not apply. It is only packages and overpacks that require marks and labels. Shippers must not attach marks and labels to ULD’s.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Further information can be found here:

http://www.iata.org/lithiumbatteries

You may also contact the airline of your choice or your national civil aviation authority if you have any further concerns on the use or carriage of data loggers containing small batteries that are active (on) while in transport.

You can also contact the IATA Dangerous Goods Support team if you have questions or concerns which may not have been addressed in this document: dangood@iata.org

 


FAQs for Packaging Hazardous Materials

Packaging is one of those things we tend to dismiss as an annoying necessity when products are being shipped by car, airplane, train, or ferry. This is certainly true for people selling or distributing things that are not harmful in any way. The only thing that matters for those individuals is that the product gets there on a timely basis in one piece. As long as this singular condition is met, nothing else really matters. Continue reading…


8 Steps for Increasing Warehouse Safety

Worker in hard hat hit by cardboard in warehouse

over 15000 illnesses and injuries take place every yearWorking in a warehouse can be a very rewarding job. You get a lot of physical exercise from lifting heavy objects all day, you bond closely with a group of workers that you see every day, and you play a very important role in ensuring that companies and individuals get their important orders on time. With multiple paths toward career advancement and an increase in responsibility, it is a promising opportunity for workers who are looking for a low barrier of entry.

However, one of the biggest problems when it comes to working in the warehouse is the issue of personal safety. With over 15,000 illnesses and injuries taking place every year, the warehousing industry still has a long way to go in the way of enforcing safety regulations and preventing accidents from happening in the workplace.

Warehouse safety is only possible when every single employee is involved and looking out for one another, no matter their position in the company. Here are 8 useful steps that any warehouse can take to ensure that safety remains a top priority: Continue reading…


Revisions to the 2017 58th Edition IATA DGR operator variations as of 23 December 2016.

The following are operator variations that appear in the 2017, 58th edition of the IATA Dangerous

Goods Regulations with amendments advised by airlines as of 23 December 2016. The changes to

the variations in this document are identified by the standard revision symbols but are also shown with

deleted text in strikethrough and new text in red and underline. The airlines that have advised of

changes are as follows:

  • Air Hong Kong LD Air India AI
  • Air Austral UU Air Transat TS
  • Austrian Airlines OS Cargologicair P3
  • Cathay Pacific CX Hong Kong Dragon Airlines (Cathay Dragon) KA
  • China Airlines CI Corsair International SS
  • FedEx Express FX Llc GloBus GH
  • Japan Airlines JL JetStar Asia 3K
  • PJSC Siberia Airlines S7 Swiss International LX
  • UPS Airlines 5X

2.8.4 List of Operator Variations

The variations are listed in alpha-numeric order according to the code assigned.

3K (Jetstar Asia)

3K-01 Not used.

3K-02 Division 4.1 Flammable Solids. Passengers and crew are not permitted to bring book matches onto aircraft

for personal use. Book matches are only allowed as correctly packed and declared dangerous goods

consignments (see 2.3.5.6).

3K-03 New or used internal combustion engines will not be accepted for carriage in passenger baggage.

3K-04 Oxygen or air, gaseous cylinders required for medical use are only accepted for transport in or as carry-on

baggage (see 2.3.4.1).

3K-05 Dangerous goods consigned as cargo are not accepted for carriage on any Jetstar Asia aircraft

Dangerous goods in consolidations will not be accepted for carriage except for UN 1845 Carbon dioxide solid

(dry ice) up to maximum of 145 kg per flight when used as refrigerant for a non-dangerous goods consignment.

The only exceptions are:

  • aircraft stores and equipment when prepared for transport in accordance with the current IATA Dangerous

Goods Regulations; and

  • UN 1845 Carbon dioxide solid/dry ice maximum of 145 kg per flight when used as refrigerant for nondangerous

goods.

3K-06 Lithium batteries when packed with or contained in equipment in accordance with Section II of Packing

Instruction 966, 967, 969 and 970 have to be reported as Special Loads in the NOTOC.

5X (United Parcel Service)

Note:

The most current information about UPS services and restrictions may be found at the following web site:

http://ups.com/hazmat

5X-01 Small Package Service – U.S. Domestic: Shipments of Dangerous Goods in the UPS Small Package

service with an origin and destination within the USA will be accepted by contract only, in accordance with the

current UPS “Hazardous Materials Guide.” This information is posted under the SUPPORT topic on the UPS

Home Page (www.ups.com). See also the SITE GUIDE on UPS Home Page www.ups.com, at the link for

“Hazardous Materials.” Users may also locate the UPS Guide for Shipping Hazardous Materials by using the

SEARCH function on the website. Shipments of UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries and UN 3090, Lithium metal

batteries are accepted only when prepared under Section IA or IB of the relevant Packing Instruction. Shipments

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OPERATOR VARIATIONS

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containing UN 3090 or UN 3480 prepared according to Section II are not accepted. Refer to 5X-08 for preapproval

requirements related to shipments of UN 3090.

5X-02 Small Package Service – Origins or Destinations outside U.S.: UPS International Small Package

service rules and restrictions apply to all dangerous goods shipments with an origin and/or destination outside of

the USA. Such shipments, including Biological Substances, Category B, will be accepted by contract only (see

5X-01 above for USA domestic shipments). Countries available for service are shown at the following web site

in the column for “Biological Substances, Category B:

Website: www.ups.com/content/us/en/resources/ship/idg/information/acl.html

When shipping packages requiring an IATA Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods, combination packagings

must be used and packages must not exceed 30 kg gross weight. When applicable, not more than three

compatible different dangerous goods may be contained in one outer packaging (5.0.2.11). The following

classes/divisions of Dangerous Goods are prohibited from UPS international Small Package service:

  • Class 1 (Explosives)
  • Division 2.3 (Toxic Gas)
  • Division 4.2 (Spontaneously Combustible)
  • Division 4.3 (Dangerous When Wet)
  • Division 5.1 (Oxidizer)
  • Division 5.2 (Organic Peroxide)
  • Division 6.1—Substances requiring a “Toxic” label

Shipments of UN 3506, Mercury contained in manufactured articles will be accepted only when the packages do

not require a “Toxic” sub-risk label.

  • Division 6.2 (Infectious Substances, Category A)
  • Class 7—Substances requiring a “Radioactive” White–I, Yellow–II, Yellow–III, or Fissile label.

 Radioactive Material, Excepted Package shipments are also prohibited.

  • Class 9—

 Shipments of UN 2807, Magnetized material which conform to Packing Instruction 953 are limited to

origins and destinations within the UPS International Dangerous Goods (IDG) network. A listing of

origins and destinations authorized for IDG may be found at the following link the following link:

http://www.ups.com/content/us/en/resources/ship/idg/information/acl.html. Additionally, such shipments

must be labelled in accordance with Packing Instruction 953 and documented in one of the following

ways:

 Identified as “Magnetized material” in a Package Reference field on the UPS Shipping Label; or

 Accompanied by a written document, affixed directly to the outside of the package or contained in a

resealable envelope on the package, identifying the contents as “Magnetized material”.

  • Complete information about UPS Small Package International Dangerous Goods service, including specific

limitations per package, may be found at the link for UPS GUIDE FOR SHIPPING INTERNATIONAL

DANGEROUS GOODS at the site identified in variation 5X-01.

  • All permitted Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities are accepted. UPS class/division restrictions do not

apply to Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities.

Shipments of UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries and UN 3090, Lithium metal batteries are accepted only when

prepared under Section IA or IB of the relevant Packing Instruction. Shipments containing UN 3090 or UN 3480

prepared according to Section II are not accepted. Refer to 5X-08 for pre-approval requirements related to

shipments of UN 3090.

(see 1.3.2, 8.1.6.9.1 and 10.8.3.9.1).

5X-03 UPS Air Cargo Service: Dangerous goods shipments will be accepted in Air Cargo Service by contract

only. All contract applications must be reviewed and approved by the UPS Air Dangerous Goods Department

(SDF) and Air Cargo Service (UPS Air Group-SDF). Hazard Classes accepted in Air Cargo Service are subject to

approval and shipments are subject to advance arrangement.

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Shipments of UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries and UN 3090, Lithium metal batteries are accepted only when

prepared under Section IA or IB of the relevant Packing Instruction. Shipments containing UN 3090 or UN 3480

prepared according to Section II are not accepted. Refer to 5X-08 for pre-approval requirements related to

shipments of UN 3090Approval to ship UN 3090 lithium metal batteries is required. Refer to 5X-08 and the Air

Cargo shipper contract for details.

5X-04 UPS Global Freight Forwarding: Dangerous Goods shipments in UPS Air Freight Services are accepted

by arrangements between UPS Airlines and UPS Supply Chain Solutions. Prohibited hazard classes include:

  • Divisions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4F, 1.5 and 1.6 (Explosives)
  • Division 2.3 Toxic Gases
  • Materials having either a primary or subsidiary hazard of Division 6.1–with a Packing Group I inhalation

toxicity

  • Division 6.2–(Infectious Substances, Category A)
  • Class 7 (outside of the U.S., Canada and Mexico)–substances requiring a “Radioactive” White-I, Yellow-II or

Yellow-III label.

 Materials requiring a Fissile label are not accepted in any UPS service.

 Radioactive Material, Excepted Package shipments are also prohibited outside the U.S. and Canada.

Shipments of UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries and UN 3090, Lithium metal batteries are accepted only when

prepared under Section IA or IB of the relevant Packing Instruction. Shipments containing UN 3090 or UN 3480

prepared according to Section II are not accepted. Refer to 5X-08 for pre-approval requirements related to

shipments of UN 3090.

5X-05 General: When an IATA Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods is required, the shipper must present

three original copies.

5X-06 General: To maintain compliance with USG-18, for the following listed materials, UPS requires all

packages to comply with U.S. DOT packaging requirements contained in 49 CFR 173.302(f) and 173.304(f).

Such packagings must be marked with the text “DOT31FP” on the outer package. Affected entries are:

UN 1070 — Nitrous oxide–see 49 CFR 173.340(f)

UN 1072 — Oxygen, compressed–see 49 CFR 173.302(f)

UN 2451 — Nitrogen trifluoride–see 49 CFR 173.302(f)

UN 3156 — Compressed gas, oxidizing, n.o.s.–see 49 CFR 173.302(f)

UN 3157 — Liquefied gas, oxidizing, n.o.s.–see 49 CFR 173.304(f)

UN 3356 — Oxygen generator, chemical–see 49 CFR 173.168

Carbon dioxide and oxygen mixture, compressed–see 49 CFR 173.304(f)

5X-07 General: The following limitations apply to the commodities identified here:

  • Shipments of UN3480, Lithium ion batteries and UN3090, Lithium metal batteries are accepted only when

prepared under Section I.A or I.B of the relevant Packing Instruction. Shipments containing UN3090 or

UN3480 prepared according to Section II are not accepted. Refer to 5X-08 for pre-approval requirements

related to shipments of UN3090.Depending on required routing, shipments of UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries

prepared in accordance with Section II of PI 965 may need to be returned to shippers due to prohibitions on

carrying such shipments aboard passenger aircraft. Please refer to UPS.com for details.

  • For shipments tendered without an IATA Air Waybill, lithium battery packages of UN 3480, UN 3481,

UN 3090 or UN 3091 prepared and marked/labelled in accordance with Section II of the relevant Packing

Instruction should also be marked with appropriate information on the address label or adjacent to the mark

required by 7.1.5.5 or the label shown at 7.4.8, to enable UPS to identify the shipment type when transferring

to partner air carriers. For example:

 P.I. 965-II

 P.I. 966-II

 P.I. 967-II

 P.I. 968-II

 P.I. 969-II

 P.I. 970-II

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Alternatively, such information may be included on a document accessible from the outside of the package.

  • Shipments of refurbished lithium batteries, or refurbished lithium batteries packed with or contained in

equipment are not accepted unless specifically approved by the UPS Air Dangerous Goods Department

(SDF);

  • Shipments of lithium batteries in any UPS air services (including UPS Small Package, UPS Air Freight

services or UPS Air Cargo services) which require the use of Special Provisions A88, A99 or A183 are

subject to and must receive prior approval from the UPS Air Dangerous Goods Department (SDF);

  • For UPS Small Package service, shipments of UN 3171, Battery-powered vehicle, will only be accepted

under the following conditions:

 Passenger aircraft quantities only; not accepted as CAO;

 Shipment is limited to a maximum gross weight of 30 kg;

 Vehicle containing lithium battery or batteries therein that would separately be classified as UN 3480 or

UN 3090. The battery contained in the vehicle is limited to 5 kg maximum net weight;

 For shipments of UN 3171 powered by lithium batteries, UPS requires the additional marking, “Contains

Lithium Batteries.” The marking must meet the requirements as stated in 7.1.4.4.1 and be near the

proper shipping name mark;

 Vehicle containing a wet, non-spillable battery or batteries therein that would separately be classified as

UN 2800. The battery contained in the vehicle is limited to 25 kg maximum net weight.

  • Shipments of UN 3171, Battery-powered vehicle, containing defective or damaged batteries are not

accepted by UPS.

  • Shipments of UN 3077, Environmentally hazardous substance, solid, n.o.s. will not be accepted when

contained in Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBCs) in any UPS air services (including UPS Small Package,

UPS Air Freight services or UPS Air Cargo services);

  • Shipments of UN 2807, Magnetized materials, for which the magnetic field strength exceeds 0.00525 gauss

when measured at 4.6 m from any surface of the package are not accepted in UPS services (including UPS

Small Package; UPS Air Freight services or UPS Air Cargo services);

  • Shipments of UN 3245, Genetically modified organisms or Genetically modified micro-organisms with

an origin and/or destination outside the U.S. are not accepted in UPS small package services. For UPS Air

Freight shipments, case-by-case approval is required to assure the ability to import or transit the shipments

within countries involved.

5X-08 General: UPS limits transport of UN 3090 Lithium Metal Batteries to origins and destinations within its

International Dangerous Goods (IDG) network. A listing of origins and destinations authorized for IDG may be

found at the following link: http://www.ups.com/content/us/en/resources/ship/idg/information/acl.html

All customers who wish to ship UN 3090 Lithium Metal Batteries without equipment via UPS Air services must

obtain pre-approval from UPS Airlines. The pre-approval requirement applies to lithium metal battery shipments

that are considered lightly regulated (such as small cells or batteries), as well as to lithium metal battery

shipments that are fully regulated and require dangerous goods shipping papers (Shipper’s Declaration). This

approval is separate and in addition to any other required UPS agreement.

More information regarding the approval program may be found at the following link:

http://www.ups.com/content/us/en/resources/ship/hazardous/responsible/lithium-battery-preapproval.html

AI (Air India)

AI-01 Explosives shall not be carried with the exceptions of items covered under UN 0012 and UN 0014 subject

to approval from Director General Civil Aviation.

AI-02 Class 3, Flammable liquids in Packing Group I are not acceptable for carriage.

AI-03 Division 4.3, Substances which on contact with water emit flammable gases are not accepted for carriage.

AI-04 Dangerous Goods must not be consolidated with non-dangerous goods.

AI-05 Carriage of carbon dioxide solid (dry ice) per aircraft shall be limited to the following:

(a) 1,500 kg on A330-200;

(b) 1,200 kg on B747-400/B777-300ER/B777-200LR;

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(c) 500 kg on B787-800/A310;

(d) 200 kg on A319/A320/A321/B737-800.

AI-06 A 24 hour emergency telephone number must be provided in the “Handling Information” box of the

Shipper’s Declaration and air waybill.

AI-07 Fissile material shall not be accepted for carriage.

AI-08 Only UN 3481, lithium ion batteries packed with equipment and lithium ion batteries contained in

equipment prepared in accordance with PI 966 and PI 967, respectively will be accepted for transport. UN 3091,

lithium metal batteries packed with equipment and lithium metal batteries contained in equipment prepared in

accordance with PI 969 and PI 970 respectively, are forbiddenNot used.

AI-09 Small vehicles powered by lithium batteries are forbidden for carriage on Air India flights as a part of

passenger’s baggage (checked and carry-on), examples include but are not limited to airwheel, solowheel,

hoverboard, mini-segway, balance wheel.

CI (China Airlines)

CI-01 The following dangerous goods will not be accepted for carriage as cargo on China Airlines’ passenger

flights:

  1. Class 1 to Class 8; except for UN 1072 (in compliance with SP A302), UN 2908, UN 2909, UN 2910,

UN 2911, UN 3164 meeting requirement of PI208(a) and UN 3373;

  1. fully regulated lithium ion batteries (Class 9) as per Section IA and IB of PI 965 and Section I of PI 966–

PI 967 (RLI);

  1. fully regulated lithium metal batteries as per Section I of PI 969–PI 970 (RLM).

Note:

The above prohibitions do not apply to CI company material.

CI-02 Dangerous goods in excepted quantities will not be accepted, except for radioactive materials, excepted

package (see Subsection 2.6).

CI-03 Dangerous goods in consolidations will not be accepted for carriage, except for:

(a) consolidations having one master air waybill with one or more house air waybill(s) containing only dangerous

goods; or

(b) consolidations containing the following dangerous goods and general cargo:

  • UN 1845 Carbon dioxide, solid (Dry ice) when used as a refrigerant for non-dangerous goods;
  • UN 2807 Magnetized material as per PI 953 and with field strength no more than 0.418 A/m or

0.00525 Gauss measured at a distance of 4.6 m;

  • ID 8000 Consumer commodity/UN 1266 Perfumery product;

(see 1.3.3, 8.1.2.4, 9.1.8 and 10.8.1.5).

CI-04 Any liquid dangerous goods having primary hazard or subsidiary hazard of Class 8–Corrosives in single

packaging will not be accepted unless each single packaging overpacked with rigid material to protect at least the

top and bottom of the packaging. The packages shall be stackable (see 5.0.2.14).

CI-05 Oxygen Generator Chemical UN 3356 will not be accepted for carriage except CI company material.

CI-06 The shipper must obtain an approval from Atomic Energy Council/Taiwan for the import, export,

transferring or transiting of Radioactive Material to, from, via Taiwan 7 days prior to flight departs from the State

of origin. Radioactive material, excepted package is not subject to above requirement.

Atomic Energy Council

80, Section 1, Chenggong Road

Yonghe District

New Taipei City 23452

Chinese Taipei

Tel: +886-2-8231 7919, Ext 2179/2187

Fax: +886-2-8231 7829

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CI-07 Dangerous goods offered for transport under State exemptions or approvals (e.g. as required by Special

Provision A1, A2, A106, etc.) will not be accepted for carriage.

CI-08 Radioactive material (Class 7), except for radioactive material, excepted package, must be segregated

from packages containing Class 1, 2, 3 and 8 dangerous goods.

CI-09 The following dangerous goods will not be accepted for carriage as cargo by China Airline’s aircraft:

(a) Lithium Ion cells and batteries (UN 3480) prepared in accordance with Section II of Packing Instruction 965.

(b) Lithium Metal cells and batteries (UN 3090), prepared in accordance with Section IA, IB and II of Packing

Instruction 968.

Note:

Above prohibitions does not apply to CI company material.

CX (Cathay Pacific Airways)

CX-01 UN 3480 Lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo on

Cathay Pacific Airways aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 965.

This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium ion cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3481) in accordance with PI 966

and PI 967; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

CX-02 All combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods in Packing Groups I, II or III must contain

sufficient absorbent material to absorb the entire contents of all the inner packagings.

CX-03 Not used.

CX-04 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident

concerning (each of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area

code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number” must be inserted on the DGD preferably

in the “Additional Handling Information” box, e.g. “Emergency Contact +47 67 50 00 00” (see 8.1.6.11 and

10.8.3.11).

CX-05 Liquid dangerous goods in single packagings of drums and jerricans of any material must be prepared as

follows:

  1. the steel drums/plastic drums/plastic jerricans must be protected by other strong outer packaging, for

example fibreboard box; or

  1. if prepared as an open overpack, a suitably sized plastic, foam or wooden pallet must be used to protect at

least the top and bottom of the packaging.

CX-06 In addition to the requirements of 8.2.5, the UN number(s) of all shipments of dangerous goods in

excepted quantities must be indicated on the air waybill.

CX-07 UN 3090 Lithium metal batteries. Lithium metal cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo

on Cathay Pacific Airways aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 968.

This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium metal cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3091) in accordance with PI 969

and PI 970; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

CX-08 All packages prepared in accordance with Section II of PI 967 or Section II of PI 970 must bear the lithium

battery mark or lithium battery handling label as required by 7.1.5.5 or 7.2.4.7 respectively. This requirement

applies to all packages of lithium batteries contained in equipment, even where the package contains no more

than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The requirement for the lithium battery mark or lithium

battery handling label does not apply to packages containing only button cells installed in equipment (including

circuit boards). Not used.

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FX (Federal Express)

FX-01

(a) Class 1 articles and substances offered on a FedEx International Priority Freight (IPF), FedEx International

Premium (IP1), or FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) may require a pre-alert or pre-approval. Call the

FedEx Express Freight Customer Service at (877) 398-5851 for additional information (see Packing

Instructions 101–143). Any Class 1 shipments originating in a non-U.S. location requires pre-approval. Call

your local FedEx customer service number and ask for FedEx Express Freight customer service.

(b) FedEx Express will not accept for transport any explosives assigned to Division 1.3.

FX-02

(a) Except for UN 1230—Methanol and Excepted Quantities (EQ), substances with a primary or subsidiary risk

of Division 6.1 in Packing Group I or II:

  • with an origin and destination within the USA including Puerto Rico, will only be accepted if in approved

DOT Exemption/Special Permit (SP) packaging;

  • will only be accepted for International transport in “V” rated combination packaging.

(b) Poison Inhalation Hazard (PIH) with a hazard zone “A” or any Class 2 substance with a toxic primary or

subsidiary risk label will not be accepted for carriage.

(c) Polychlorinated biphenyls: The following Class 9 materials, if known or suspected to contain PCBs, must be

packaged as follows—for liquids: IP3 or IP3A inner metal packaging with absorbent material utilized to fill all

available space; for solids: any inner packaging as per applicable packing instruction is permitted. Outer

packaging must be a 1A2 steel drum, 4H2 plastic box, USA DOT-SP 8249, 9168 or 11248 (see Packing

Instructions [–] listed after each substance):

UN 2315 — Polychlorinated biphenyls, liquid [964]

UN 3077 — Environmentally hazardous substance, solid, n.o.s. [956, Y956]

UN 3082 — Environmentally hazardous substance, liquid, n.o.s.  [964, Y964]

UN 3432 — Polychlorinated biphenyls, solid [956]

(d) All U.S. domestic shipments of Division 4.3 must be offered either under a limited quantity “Y” prefix Packing

Instruction or offered using a DOT special permit that does not require placarding for road transport.

Shipments originating in the U.S. and destined for a non-U.S. location must be offered under a limited

quantity “Y” prefix Packing Instruction or dropped off at a FedEx Express staffed facility that accepts

dangerous goods. Shipments originating in non-U.S. locations destined for a U.S. location must either be

offered under a limited quantity “Y” prefix Packing Instruction or sent as hold for pickup at a staffed FedEx

Express facility that accepts dangerous goods.

(e) FedEx Express will only accept Oxygen, compressed (UN 1072) when packed in an ATA Specification 300

Category I outer packaging. Packaging must be marked in accordance with the marking criteria of Air

Transportation Association (ATA) specification No. 300. In addition, FedEx Express will require the outer

package to have the additional tested specification mark of DOT31FP (see Packing Instruction 200 and

USG-15(d)). The additional tested specification mark of DOT31FP will be required in addition to the

specification container utilized and marked for all UN numbers listed in USG-18 which include UN3156,

UN 3157, UN 2451, UN 1070 and UN 3356.

(f) When using International Economy (IE) or International Economy Freight (IEF) to ship liquids in the primary

hazard classes/divisions of 3, 4.2, 5.1, 5.2 and 8, customers must use “V rated” packaging. See

www.fedex.com/us ; keyword dangerous goods (search field); FedEx Services Available to Ship Dangerous

Goods.

FX-03

(a) Class 7 substances offered on FedEx International Priority Freight (IPF), FedEx International Premium (IP1),

or FedEx International Express Freight (IXF) may require a pre-alert or pre-approval. Call (877) 398-5851 for

additional information. Plutonium 239 and 241 will not be accepted as UN 3324, UN 3325, UN 3326,

UN 3327, UN 3328, UN 3329, UN 3330, UN 3331 or UN 3333.

(b) FedEx Express will not accept labelled radioactive material with a subsidiary risk of 1.4, 3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1,

5.2, 8, or 2.2 with a Cargo Aircraft Only label unless the shipper has been pre-approved.

Class 7 shipments originating in a non-U.S. location require pre-approval. Call your local FedEx customer

service number and ask for FedEx Express Freight customer service.

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OPERATOR VARIATIONS

23 December 2016 Page 8/15

(c) All fissile shipments worldwide require pre-approval. Call 1-901-434-3200 for assistance.

(d) For mixtures or solutions of radionuclides enter “mixture” or “solution” as appropriate in the Quantity and

Type of Packaging in association with the physical and chemical form (e.g. liquid salt solution or solid oxide

mixture).

(e) FedEx Express will not accept Radioactive Material, Excepted Package (UN 2908, UN 2909, UN 2910,

UN 2911) in an Overpack nor will more than one package on a skid/pallet be accepted.

FX-04

(a) The following Class 8 substances will not be accepted for carriage (see Packing Instructions [–] listed

after each substance):

UN Number — Description

UN 1796 Nitrating acid mixture, over 40% concentration [854, 855]

UN 1826 Nitrating acid mixtures, spent, over 40% concentration [854, 855]

UN 2031 Nitric acid, over 40% concentration [854, 855]

When shipping the above substances in acceptable concentrations, the concentration MUST be indicated on

the Shipper’s Declaration in association with the proper shipping name.

(b) Hazardous waste as defined in USG-04, will not be accepted for carriage.

(c) Division 6.2, items classed as Risk Group 4 by the World Health Organization (WHO) will not be accepted for

carriage.

(d) The following substances will not be accepted for carriage (see Packing Instructions [–] listed after each

substance):

UN Number — Description

UN 1001 Acetylene, dissolved [200]

UN 1162 Dimethyldichlorosilane [377]

UN 1308 Zirconium suspended in a flammable liquid, Packing Group I, [361]

UN 1873 Perchloric acid, over 50% concentration [553]

(e) FedEx Express will not accept for transport any item with an A2 or that meets the definition of A183 or A209

Special Provision even with a Competent Authority approval.

FX-05

(a) FedEx Express will not accept UN 3090 or UN 3480 offered as Section II.

(b) All UN 3090 lithium metal batteries under Packing Instruction 968 (Section IA, IB) require pre-approval. See

www.fedex.com/us ; keyword lithium batteries (search field).

(c) All lithium batteries (Section I, IA, IB and II) in all packing instructions must not be shipped in the same

package as the following dangerous goods classes/divisions: 1.4, 2.1, 3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2 and 8 and 2.2

with a Cargo Aircraft Only label. This includes All Packed in One, Overpacks and combination All Packed in

One/Overpacks.

(d) All Section II lithium batteries must have the UN number(s) added to the IATA lithium battery handling label

(Caution) effective 1/1/17. When the lithium battery handling label (IATA Figure 7.4.H) is applied to packages

/ overpacks for Section IB and II lithium battery shipments, the applicable UN number(s) must be marked on

the package adjacent to the lithium battery handling label.

FX-06 Dangerous goods packages that cannot accommodate all of the required Federal Express and regulatory

documentation as well as all required regulatory markings and labelling on the top or sides of the outer package,

will not be accepted for carriage. Any required documentation, marking and labelling will not be permitted on the

bottom of the package. FedEx branded packaging including brown boxes may not be used to ship dangerous

goods or dry ice. Exceptions: FedEx Express white and brown boxes and tubes may be used for FedEx Express

Section II lithium battery shipments. UN 3373, Biological Substance Category B may be shipped in the FedEx

UN 3373 Pak and the FedEx Clinical Box.

FX-07 This variation applies only when FX-18 does not apply. Hand written Shipper’s Declarations will not be

accepted. The following fields on the Shipper’s Declaration must be typed or computer generated:

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UN or ID number including the prefix, Proper shipping name, Hazard class or division, Subsidiary risk or

division(s), Packing Group, Packaging Type, Packing Instruction, Authorization, Emergency telephone number.

Note:

The technical name, when required, may be handwritten.

For radioactive shipments, in addition to the items listed above the following must also be typed or computer

generated:

Radionuclide, Special Form or Physical and Chemical Form All other entries may be handwritten.

Handwritten alterations/amendments to an entry required to be typed per FX-07 are acceptable if each

alteration/amendment is legible and signed with the same signature used to sign the Shipper’s Declaration.

FX-08 When a Shipper’s Declaration is required, three (3) copies must be provided with each shipment at the

origin location. At least two of the copies must have the diagonal hatchings printed vertically in the left and right

margins and must be printed in red.

FX-09 Not used.

FX-10 Not used.

FX-11 Not used.

FX-12 Not used.

FX-13 Not used.

FX-14 Not used.

FX-15 Not used.

FX-16 Not used.

FX-17 Not used.

FX-18 Shipper’s Declarations for dangerous goods for all FedEx Express® dangerous goods shipments

originating in the U.S. must be prepared using software with dangerous goods compliance edit checks and by

one of the following methods:

  • Certain FedEx electronic shipping solutions;
  • Recognized shipper proprietary software; or
  • FedEx recognized dangerous goods vendor software.

FX-18 currently does not apply to:

  • Shipments originating in non-U.S. locations (including U.S. territories overseas, such as Puerto Rico);
  • FedEx International Express Freight® (IXF) and FedEx International Premium® (IP1);
  • Shipments containing Class 7 radioactive materials.

Note:

A list of FedEx recognized dangerous goods shipping application vendors can be reviewed at www.fedex.com/us;

dangerous goods (keyword).

GH (Llc GloBus)

GH-01 Shipment of dangerous goods transported by Llc GloBus flights will only be acceptable after getting

advance approval of Llc GloBus. Requests for dangerous goods shipments must be sent to the following email

address: email: cgo@s7.ru

Request for approval must be submitted and be made according to the special form of approval (form is provided

by request). Form of approval to be attached to the set of accompanying documents and forwarded on board to

the crew by the handling company at the airport of departure.

GH-02 Patient specimens will only be accepted if assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900 or UN 3373 as appropriate.

Biological substance, Category B–UN 3373 may only be accepted for carriage under necessary requirements

and after a prior Llc GloBus written approval has been grantedNot used.

GH-03 The Shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident

concerning (any of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area

code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number” must be inserted on the Shipper’s DGD

in the “Additional Handling Information” box, e.g. “Emergency Contact +7(495)-123-45-78”.

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JL (Japan Airlines)

JL-01 A unit load device (ULD) containing dangerous goods other than those indicated in 9.1.4, which is

transferred from another carrier, will not be accepted, unless otherwise approved by Japan Airlines.

JL-02 Not used.

JL-03 Type B(M) Packages and/or any SCO, or LSA Materials in Industrial Packagings will not be accepted for

carriage (see Subsection 10.5).

JL-04 Not used.

JL-05 Any Type B(U) Packages will not be accepted for carriage on passenger aircraft unless they are intended

for use in or incident to medical diagnosis, treatment or research (see 10.9.3, 10.5.11 and 10.10.2).

JL-06 Magnetized materials will not be carried aboard an aircraft if the net weight of the magnet itself exceeds:

  • 2,000 kg or 4,400 lb in each Unit Load Device (ULD) and bulk compartment—(B-747F or B-747 aircraft);
  • 2,000 kg or 4,400 lb in each Unit Load Device (ULD) and bulk compartment—(B-767F or B-767 aircraft);
  • 2,000 kg or 4,400 lb in each Unit Load Device (ULD) and bulk compartment—(B-777 aircraft);
  • 600 kg or 1,320 lb in one aircraft—(B-737 aircraft).

(see Packing Instruction 953).

JL-07 Not used.

JL-08 Division 6.1, Toxic substances in Packing Group I will not be accepted for carriage. Substances assigned

to Packing Group I with a toxic primary or subsidiary hazard or substances with a toxic primary or subsidiary

hazard that are required to be in Packing Group I performance standard packagings are forbidden for carriage.

JL-09 Liquid dangerous goods in single packagings of steel drums (1A1 or 1A2) and steel jerricans (3A1 or 3A2),

will not be accepted unless overpacked with suitable material to protect at least the top and bottom of the

packaging.

JL-10 Not used.

JL-11 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in the case of an accident or incident

concerning each of the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including the country and

area code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number”, must be inserted on the DGD,

preferably in the “Handling Information” box, e.g. Emergency Contact +47 67 50 00 00 (see 8.1.6.11 and

10.8.3.11).

A 24-hour emergency telephone number is not required for shipments that do not require a Shipper’s Declaration

for Dangerous Goods.

KA (Hong Kong Dragon Airlines (Cathay Dragon))

KA-01 UN 3480 Lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo on

Cathay Dragon aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 965.

This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium ion cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3481) in accordance with PI 966

and PI 967; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

KA-02 All combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods in Packing Groups I, II or III must contain

sufficient absorbent material to absorb the entire contents of all the inner packagings.

KA-03 Not used.

KA-04 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident

concerning (each of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area

code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number” must be inserted on the DGD preferably

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

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in the “Additional Handling Information” box, e.g. “Emergency Contact +47 67 50 00 00” (see 8.1.6.11 and

10.8.3.11).

KA-05 Liquid dangerous goods in single packagings of drums and jerricans of any material must be prepared as

follows:

  1. the steel drums/plastic drums/plastic jerricans must be protected by other strong outer packaging, for

example fibreboard box; or

  1. if prepared as an open overpack, a suitably sized plastic, foam or wooden pallet must be used to protect at

least the top and bottom of the packaging.

KA-06 In addition to the requirements of 8.2.5, the UN number(s) of all shipments of dangerous goods in

excepted quantities must be indicated on the air waybill.

KA-07 UN 3090 Lithium metal batteries. Lithium metal cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo

on Cathay Dragon aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 968.

This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium metal cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3091) in accordance with PI 969

and PI 970; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

KA-08 All packages prepared in accordance with Section II of PI 967 or Section II of PI 970 must bear the lithium

battery mark or lithium battery handling label as required by 7.1.5.5 or 7.2.4.7 respectively. This requirement

applies to all packages of lithium batteries contained in equipment, even where the package contains no more

than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The requirement for the lithium battery mark or lithium

battery handling label does not apply to packages containing only button cells installed in equipment (including

circuit boards). Not used.

LD (Air Hong Kong)

LD-01 UN 3480 Lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo on Air

Hong Kong aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 965.

This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium ion cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3481) in accordance with PI 966

and PI 967; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

LD-02 All combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods in Packing Groups I, II or III must contain

sufficient absorbent material to absorb the entire contents of all the inner packagings.

LD-03 Not used.

LD-04 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident

concerning (each of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area

code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number” must be inserted on the DGD preferably

in the “Additional Handling Information” box, e.g. “Emergency Contact +47 67 50 00 00” (see 8.1.6.11 and

10.8.3.11).

LD-05 Liquid dangerous goods in single packagings of drums and jerricans of any material must be prepared as

follows:

  1. the steel drums/plastic drums/plastic jerricans must be protected by other strong outer packaging, for

example fibreboard box; or

  1. if prepared as an open overpack, a suitably sized plastic, foam or wooden pallet must be used to protect at

least the top and bottom of the packaging.

LD-06 In addition to the requirements of 8.2.5, the UN number(s) of all shipments of dangerous goods in

excepted quantities must be indicated on the air waybill.

LD-07 UN 3090 Lithium metal batteries. Lithium metal cells and batteries are prohibited from carriage as cargo

on Air Hong Kong aircraft. This applies to Section IA, IB and Section II of Packing Instruction 968.

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This prohibition does not apply to:

  • lithium metal cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment (UN 3091) in accordance with PI 969

and PI 970; or

  • lithium batteries (rechargeable and non-rechargeable) covered by the Provisions for Dangerous Goods

Carried by Passengers or Crew (see 2.3.2 to 2.3.5 and Table 2.3.A).

LD-08 All packages prepared in accordance with Section II of PI 967 or Section II of PI 970 must bear the lithium

battery mark or lithium battery handling label as required by 7.1.5.5 or 7.2.4.7 respectively. This requirement

applies to all packages of lithium batteries contained in equipment, even where the package contains no more

than four cells or two batteries installed in equipment. The requirement for the lithium battery mark or lithium

battery handling label does not apply to packages containing only button cells installed in equipment (including

circuit boards). Not used.

LX (Swiss International)

LX-01 Following class 7 articles or substances will not be accepted for carriage (see Subsection 10.4):

UN Number — Description

UN 2919 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement non fissile or fissile excepted

UN 2977 Radioactive material, uranium hexafluoride, fissile

UN 3321 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II) non fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3322 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III) non fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3324 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II), fissile

UN 3325 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III), fissile

UN 3326 Radioactive material, surface contaminated objects (SCO-I or SCO-II), fissile

UN 3327 Radioactive material, Type A package, fissile non-special form

UN 3328 Radioactive material, Type B(U) package, fissile

UN 3329 Radioactive material, Type B(M) package, fissile

UN 3330 Radioactive material, Type C package, fissile

UN 3331 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement, fissile

UN 3333 Radioactive material, Type A package, special form, fissile

LX-02 Except for ID 8000, Consumer commodity, dangerous goods in limited quantities (“Y” packing

instructions) will not be accepted for carriage (see Subsection 2.7 and all “Y” Packing Instructions).

LX-03 Mercurial barometers or thermometers will not be accepted for carriage in baggage, except a small

medical or clinical thermometer for personal use when in its protective case (see 2.3.3.1).

LX-04 Camping stoves (gas or fuel) will not be accepted for carriage in baggage. This variation applies also to

used camping stoves which have been thoroughly cleaned (see 2.3.2.5).

LX-05 The shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person who is knowledgeable of

the hazard, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident. The telephone number

must include the country and area code preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number”, must

be inserted on the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods, preferably in the “Handling Information” box.

A 24-hour emergency telephone is not required for shipments that do not require a Shipper’s Declaration for

Dangerous Goods.

LX-06 The following items are not accepted for carriage as cargo:

  • UN 3090 Lithium metal batteries–PI 968, Section IA, IB and II
  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries packed with equipment–PI 969, Section I
  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries contained in equipment–PI 970, Section I
  • UN 3480 Lithium ion batteries–PI 965, Section IA, IB and II
  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries packed with equipment–PI 966, Section I

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  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment–PI 967, Section I

LX-07 UN 3171 Battery-Powered Vehicles are not accepted as cargo. This prohibition does not

apply to UN 3171 Battery-Powered Equipment.

OS (Austrian Airlines)

OS-01 UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment, PI 967, Section I (battery/pack more than 100 Wh)

will not be accepted for carriage as cargo. Dangerous goods in “Limited Quantities” (“Y” Packing Instructions) will

not be accepted for carriage. Exception: Consumer commodity (ID 8000) will be accepted (see Subsection 2.7

and all “Y” Packing Instructions).

OS-02 Not used Dangerous goods in consolidations will not be accepted for carriage, except for the following

shipments:

  • consolidations containing UN1845, Carbon dioxide, solid (Dry ice) when used as a refrigerant;
  • consolidations with only one house air waybill;
  • consolidations with more than one house air waybill, in case of identical shipper.

OS-03 Dangerous goods in “Limited Quantities” (“Y” Packing Instructions) will not be accepted for carriage.

Exception: Consumer commodity (ID 8000) will be accepted (see Subsection 2.7 and all “Y” Packing

Instructions). Biological substance, Category B (UN 3373) will not be accepted in air mail (see 2.4).

OS-04 Biological substance, Category B (UN 3373) will not be accepted in air mail (see 2.4). UN 3356 Oxygen

generator, chemical will not be accepted.

OS-05 UN 3373 Biological substance, Category B will be accepted as cargo if the packaging meets the

requirements of Packing Instruction 620. Marking and entries on the air waybill must comply with IATA

requirements for UN 3373.

OS-06 Fissile Material will not be accepted.

OS-07 Intermediate bulk containers (IBC) will not be accepted. Exception: The IBC packagings 11A, 21A, 11B,

21B, 11N, 21N and 11C will be accepted under the condition that they are stackable with a minimum topload of

2,000 kg (stacking test load at least 3,600 kg). Advance arrangements with Lufthansa Cargo AG are required.

OS-08 The following restrictions apply to lithium ion and lithium metal batteries as follows:

  1. UN 3480 Lithium ion batteries prepared in accordance with Section IA, IB and II PI 965 and UN 3090 Lithium

metal batteries prepared in accordance with Section IA, IB and II PI 968 will not be accepted for carriage as

cargo;

  1. All consignments containing the following lithium batteries are prohibited as cargo on passenger aircraft and

must be shown on the DGD as Cargo Aircraft Only with packages bearing the Cargo Aircraft Only label:

  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries packed with equipment prepared in accordance with Section I of

PI 969;

  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries contained in equipment prepared in accordance with Section I of

PI 970;

  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries packed with equipment prepared in accordance with Section I of PI 966;
  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment prepared in accordance with Section I of PI 967.
  1. All consignments containing the following lithium batteries are permitted as cargo on passenger and cargo

aircraft:

  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries packed with equipment in accordance with Section II of PI 966;
  • UN 3481 Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment in accordance with Section II of PI 967;
  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries packed with equipment in accordance with Section II of PI 969;
  • UN 3091 Lithium metal batteries contained in equipment in accordance with Section II of PI 970.

OS-09 All consignments containing UN 3171 Battery-powered vehicle and Battery-powered equipment are

prohibited on passenger aircraft.

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P3 (Cargologicair)

P3-01 Packages with dangerous goods, primary risk of Class 8, labelled “Cargo Aircraft Only”, are forbidden for

transport on lower deck of the aircraft.

P3-02 UN 3090, Section IA of PI 968 and UN 3091, Section I of PI 969 and PI 970 are accepted for carriage

upon prior approval of the airline. Request for approval must be by email: dg@cargologicair.com

P3-03 UN3480, Section 1A of PI 965 and UN3481, Section 1 of PI 966 and PI967 are accepted for carriage upon

prior approval of the airline. Request for approval must be via email: dg@cargologicair.com

P3-04 UN3480 Section 1B, 11 of PI965, UN3481 Section 11 of PI966 and PI967, UN3090 Section 1B,11 of PI

968 and UN3091, Section 11 of PI969 and PI 970 are accepted for carriage only with a completed and signed

“Shippers Declaration for Lithium Battery” form. This form can be obtained from local airline offices or via email:

dg@cargologicair.com

S7 (PJSC Siberia Airlines)

S7-01 Shipment of dangerous goods transported by Siberia Airlines flights will only be acceptable after getting

advance approval of Siberia Airlines. Requests for dangerous goods shipments must be sent to the following

email address: email: cgo@s7.ru

Request for approval must be submitted and be made according to the special form of approval (form is provided

by request). Form of approval to be attached to the set of accompanying documents and forwarded on board to

the crew by the handling company at the airport of departure.

S7-02 Patient specimens will only be accepted if assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900 or UN 3373 as appropriate.

Biological substance, Category B–UN 3373 may only be accepted for carriage under necessary requirements

and after a prior Siberia Airlines written approval has been grantedNot used.

S7-03 The Shipper must provide a 24-hour emergency telephone number of a person/agency who is

knowledgeable of the hazards, characteristics and actions to be taken in case of an accident or incident

concerning (any of) the dangerous goods being transported. This telephone number, including country and area

code, preceded by the words “Emergency Contact” or “24-hour number” must be inserted on the Shipper’s DGD

in the “Additional Handling Information” box, e.g. “Emergency Contact +7(495)-123-45-78”.

SS (Corsair)

SS-01 Class 7—Radioactive material, including all categories of excepted packages, will not be accepted for

transport (see 10.10.2).

SS-02 Diving lamps are accepted by Corsair International only in carry-on baggage (see 2.3.4.6).

SS-03 The word x package of “Lithium [ion or metal] batteries in compliance with Section II of PI966, PI967,

PI969 or PI970” must be added in the “other load” part of the NOTOC, or as a remark, where “x” is the number of

package(s).

Note:

The number of packages marked with the lithium battery handling label in compliance with the Section II of the

packing instructions 966-967,969-970, must be added in the nature of the product box of the air waybill.

SS-04 For shipments of UN 3171 powered by lithium batteries, Corsair International requires the additional

marking, “Contains Lithium Batteries.” The marking must meet the requirements as stated in 7.1.4.4.1 and be

near the proper shipping name mark.

SS-05 Where any doubt arises regarding the classification or identification of a substance, the shipper must

provide, upon request by Corsair Int or its representative, the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for the

substance. The MSDS must include the UN number, packing group if necessary, proper shipping name, and all

other relevant transport information.

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OPERATOR VARIATIONS

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TS (Air Transat)

TS-01 Air Transat Cargo will only accept for carriage dangerous goods of the following classes as cargo:

  • Class 2: Gases;
  • Class 3: Flammable liquids;
  • Class 8: Corrosives; and
  • Class 9: Miscellaneous dangerous goods.

TS-02 In addition to the limits of TS-01, biological substance, Category B, UN 3373 will not be accepted.

TS-03 The following dangerous goods will not be accepted as cargo:

  • UN 3091, Lithium metal batteries packed with equipment (PI 969, Section I and II);
  • UN 3091, Lithium metal batteries contained in equipment (PI 970, Section I and II); and
  • UN 3480, Lithium ion batteries (PI 965, Section IA, IB and II).

TS-04 Battery-powered wheelchairs or mobility-aids with spillable batteries will not be accepted.

Note:

Battery-powered wheelchairs and mobility aids with non-spillable or lithium batteries are acceptable.

TS-05 Lithium Ion battery UN 3481 when shipped as cargo prepared in accordance with Section II of Packing

Instruction 966 or with Section II of Packing Instruction 967 must be indentified on the NOTOC.

UU (Air Austral)

UU-01 Dangerous goods as defined in the current edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations will not be

accepted in AIR MAIL (see 2.4 and 10.2.2).

UU-02 Dangerous goods as defined below will not be accepted for carriage on board Air Austral aircraft:

(a) Division 2.3—Toxic gases;

(b) Division 6.1—Toxic substances in Packing Group I.

UU-03 Radioactive material will not be accepted for carriage other than radioactive material, excepted package,

AOG aircraft components, (see 10.10.2).

UU-04 Battery-powered mobility aids with spillable batteries will only be accepted through Air Austral Cargo (see

2.3.2.3).

UU-05 All blood products and biological samples, human or animal origin, must be carried as Cargo. They are

not permitted as baggage. They must be classified as UN 2814, Infectious substance, affecting humans,

(liquid or solid) or UN 2900, Infectious substances, affecting animals, (liquid or solid) both in Division 6.2 and

packed according to Packing Instruction 620. The only exception to this rule is human or animal blood and

plasma free from any pathogen and destined for human or veterinary treatment. In these cases, the shipment

must be classified as non-dangerous pharmaceuticals, life-saving drugs. The air waybill must bear a detailed

commodity description to enable identification.

Biological substance, Category B, UN 3373 may be accepted only as cargo and as long as a valid and free from

any Pathogen Biological Certification is dully given to the Operator and must be packed in accordance with

Packing Instruction 650 (see Packing Instruction 650).

UU-06 The following dangerous goods permitted in passenger baggage as per 2.3 and Table 2.3.A are only

allowed with the approval of the operator:

  • fuel cell cartridges (2.3.5.10);
  • non-infectious specimens containing small quantities of flammable liquids (2.3.5.14);
  • internal combustion or fuel cell engines (2.3.5.15).

UU-07 Chemical agent monitoring equipment containing radioactive materials carried by staff members of the

Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) are forbidden on the Air Austral network.


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Popular Dimensions of Commercial Shipping Crates & Barrels

When it comes to the warehouse and shipping industries, there are a wide variety of shipping crates and barrels that are used in order to get the job done. Given the diversity of products and goods that are shipped all over the world, there is no one-size-fits-all solution that is going to work. Each product is unique and requires a different solution in order to have it transported safely from one place to another. One of the criteria that separates the shipping mediums from one another is size.

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