Key Books for Regulation Insight on Packing Supplies for Dangerous Goods

IMO_CATALOGUEKey books for regulation insight on packing supplies for dangerous goods are being offered from our company at competitive pricing. From our perspective, there is no bar that cannot be surpassed, which is why we’re constantly striving to increase our knowledge and understanding on the subject of packaging supplies for shipping dangerous goods.

As most of our customer can testify to, one of the reasons that our company has been so successful over the years is our humble attitude. The rules and regulations for packaging supplies for shipping dangerous goods are constantly updating. For instance, recently there has been increase scrutiny on lithium batteries. Our family owned business, with a high achieving team of specialists are closely watching the proceedings to insure that our customers are able to cooperate with strict compliance with the law.

But just because we’re experts on the proceedings, doesn’t mean you can’t improve your knowledge! Our company is currently selling IATA products; IMO Regulations products; Emergency Response Guidebooks; and CFR 49 – Code of Federal Regulations Title 49. We aren’t selling these products to claim intellectual superiority on an important section of business. Encompassed in each of the products from these categories are important information that is practical to be aware of. This can help you save time and money in the long-run, because you can better maintain your business and compliance with existing law.

To ship dangerous goods by air, IATA products are the industry standard. These assist in classification, packing, marking, labeling and document shipments of dangerous goods. Essentially, to stay in compliance with state and airline requirements, one must use the knowledge encompassed in these materials. Our company has a significant array of materials to choose from to access these materials. They can come in books, CD-Roms, or kits/combos. Over the years of being an industry leader, our company has amassed clients from several different regions of the world. Therefore, the 2016 57th Edition IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, in addition to coming in perfect or spiral bound, are customizable in various languages, which include the following: English, Spanish, French and German. We also offer the ability of summarization! For the 2016 57th Edition IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations book on our online store, you can view significant changes that have been made in 2016. This book is utilized by more than 200 airlines. From the product description on our website, the book “covers every facet of national and international shipping regulations, including a comprehensive Dangerous Goods list detailing Proper Shipping Names and labeling requirements, packing requirements, training guidelines and up-to-date information on shipping forms.”

From the International Maritime Organization, our company provides comprehensive information for ocean shipping regulations. A popular combination that is purchased from our company is both the IMDG Code 2014-16 37th Edition and the IMDG Code Supplement 37th Current Edition—with the latter clarifying difficult sections from the former. From the product description, this book is “intended for use not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping, and contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action.” An excellent option that is less of a strain on your eyes being that it utilizes your ears is the IMDG Code for Windows (V12), 2014. It is highly portable and contains a trove of necessary information.

2016 Emergency Response Guidebook A third educational book is the Emergency Response Guidebook—otherwise known as the ERG Book. This book provides the most recent dangerous goods in a list format. In addition, the book provides information for emergency responders to accurately and quickly access a hazmat incident. The 2016 Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG), Regular Bound comes in a 5½” x 7½” standard size. From the product description:

The Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG 2016) was developed jointly by the US Department of Transportation, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation of Mexico (SCT) for use by firefighters, police, and other emergency services personnel who may be the first to arrive at the scene of a transportation incident involving a hazardous material. It is primarily a guide to aid first responders in (1) quickly identifying the specific or generic classification of the material(s) involved in the incident, and (2) protecting themselves and the general public during this initial response phase of the incident. The ERG is updated every three to four years to accommodate new products and technology.

As is apparent, this product offered from our company is comprehensive and provides excellent information.

Lastly, we’re offering the CFR 49 – Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 book in either regular bound or spiral bound. Currently, these products are for presale, but will be available in mid spring 2016. Encompassed within these books is valuable information for shipments utilizing domestic transportation; while also including all modes of transportation as well (ocean, air, highway and rail). This product is in no way considered light reading, coming in eight volumes.

In conclusion, amongst our vast inventory are several important books that pertain to regulations. Being an industry leader for many years wasn’t by accident or luck; rather, a firm determination to follow the best industry practices and ensuring we deliver products that have 100 percent compliance. For additional question, feel free to engage in a Live Chat with one of our specialists or call us directly, from Monday to Friday, at (866) 272-9880, between the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. We strongly believe that there is no such thing as a stupid question. A successful relationship with our customers is paramount to our success. Therefore, feel free to ask us any question that you deem pertinent to the success of your business. To learn more about updates in the industry, products sold from our company, and general information on packing supplies for dangerous goods, visit: http://www.airseacontainers.com/blog/. From there, you can locate a lot of useful information from our blog, which is constantly being updated.


Compliance Department: Labels and Placards that Conform to U.S. Department of Transportation Guidelines

When shipping hazardous product, it is imperative that you follow all of the rules. For seasoned companies, non-compliance is equated with lack of professionalism (and from time-to-time, negative repercussions). We understand your dedication to the highest ethics, which is why we have so many repeat customers.

One of the areas that our company specializes in is the production of labels and placards. These include Hazmat Labels, Placards, Regulated Shipping Labels and Shipping and Handling Labels. Each of these categories of labels and placards conform fully to the U.S. Dept. of Transportation’s; ICAO; IATA and IMDG guidelines.

Our labels and placards are fade-resistant, pressure sensitive and highly durable. This ensures that your product gets to where you need it, when you need it, saving you paranoia. For the busy business owner, this promise allows them to focus on more pressing matters.

This article will focus on one aspect of our labels and placards, which are Hazmat Labels. Hazmat Labels from our company come in nine different classes. If you find a lower price from one of our competitors, we will gladly match that price. Wholesale discounts are also offered from our company.

The Nine Classes of Hazmat Labels for Shipping Hazardous Materials and Dangerous Goods

Hazmat Labels come in various class levels, which properly label the type of product being shipped, regardless of the method of transportation—which can include through the ocean, by train, on the highway or through the air.

Explosives 1.4B Label Roll of 500Our Hazmat Class 1 Labels come in two general varieties, which are 1.3G labels and an array of 1.4 labels. An example of these is the “Explosives 1.4B Label Roll of 500.” As the name implies, these come in a roll of 500 and are sold for the inexpensive price of $28 dollars. They label the Hazard Class 1: Explosives Division Group 1.4B shipments and are sized as 4” x 4” in.

Hazard Class 2 Labels come in a variety of warnings, depending upon the contents of the shipment. From our company, these can include the following: Non-Flammable Gas, Flammable Gas, Toxic Gas, Inhalation Toxic Gas, and Oxygen Label. The Hazard Class 2: Toxic Gas Division 2.3 label, “Toxic Gas Label, Roll of 500,” is sized as 4” x 4” in. and is priced at $25 dollars.

The Hazard Class 3 Labels available for purchase are for Combustible and Flammable Liquid shipments. Combustible liquids have higher flashpoints than flammable liquids making them safer than the latter. In these shipments, you can use our “Combustible Class 3 Label, Roll of 500” label, which is priced at $25 dollars.

While flammable liquids, such as ether, requires more attention to detail due to their increased risk. For shipments like these, our “Flammable Liquid Label, Roll of 500” can be used. It is priced at $25 dollars as well.

Our Hazard Class 4 Labels consist of the following: Flammable Solid, Spontaneously Combustible and Dangerous When Wet labels. Each of these are priced at $25 dollars. Flammable solids, for instance, even without oxygen can catch fire through friction. The Flammable Solid Label, Roll of 500 is offered from our company to address those shipments.

For Hazard Class 5 Labels, we offer both Oxidizer and Organic Peroxides Labels (regarding the Organic Peroxides shipments, we recommend also purchasing a gel pack from our company, which can help maintain the ideal temperatures for safe shipping). Oxidizers are a type of chemical that is necessary in the burning of fuel. Organic Peroxides, on the other hand, is a compound that has two oxygen atoms, which in its molecule are bonded together.

For shipments that require Hazard Class 6 Labels, our company sells four different types of labels, which are the following: Toxic Substances, Infectious Substances, Inhalation and Harmful Stow Away from Food Labels.

Radioactive Category III Label, Roll of 500On Hazard Class 7 Labels, our company offers the following three labels: Radioactive Category I, II and III labels. These shipments may have product that could potential emit emission of ionizing radiation or particles.

For Hazard Class 8, we offer only Corrosive Labels. These come in a roll of 500 and are priced at $25 dollars. Corrosive items can eat away at items, making them known to be deleterious. For instance, these solids or liquids can cause significant damage to the human skin upon contact.

Lastly, for Hazard Class 9, we offer three different options, which are Miscellaneous, Dry Ice UN 1845 and Consumer Commodity ID 8000 Labels. A new offering from this line of labels is the “Dry Ice UN 1845 Label, Roll of 500 -6×6″,” which with its increased size, allows easier interpretation of the product held within.

Securing Your Hazmat Labels for Future Shipments

To secure your Hazmat Labels, you can purchase these labels online through our shopping cart. If you have additional questions, such as on whether you are ordering the correct label, or recommended products to include with your purchase like gel packs, you can reach out to our direct line: (866) 272-9880. Alternatively, you can initiate a Live Chat with one of our specialists.

Our hours of specialist communication are from Monday to Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. During offline hours, visit our blog—by clicking here—where you can learn more information about our products and company history. As a family owned company that has been in business for over 25 years, we pride ourselves on being your one stop shop for all of your Hazmat and Dangerous Goods needs. Key features and benefits offered from our company are the following:

  • ISO 9001 Certified
  • BBB.org Accredited Business with A+ Rating
  • Huge Selection of Dangerous Goods Packaging
  • Sustainable recycled packaging
  • Providing everything you need to get your Dangerous Goods shipped
  • Affordable and Lowest Prices
  • Price Matching on almost all products
  • Great Quality Products
  • Customer satisfaction and support
  • Same day shipping on most orders
  • Sales professionals with knowledge and experience
  • Shopping convenience
  • Secured and private shopping

Thanks for reading this article; cheers to your success!


Air Sea Containers:  A Distributor of IMO Manuals

IMDG Code

For the past twenty years, you have been working as a chemicals distribution manager for a small company specializing in removing chemicals from gas lines.  The chemicals that you provide are pivotal to the success of all the plants that are in various states; built from the pre-commissioning and commissioning phases (where the equipment is tested for functionality and errors (if any) are corrected) to the decommissioning phase where the unit is shut down and dismantled and the chemicals are either returned or destroyed.  Any of the spent chemicals are either shipped to a recycling plant or buried because all the chemicals that are involved in your company’s processes are earth friendly.  Up until this point, you have been relying on the railways to deliver your cargo to your clients, because they were domestic.

The farthest your chemicals shipped was to California, at a remote gas refinery.  It was only a few moments ago that you were informed that your company will be dealing with international clientele, starting with a large chemical delivery to Japan.  Not only is this delivery large, but it is the largest chemical delivery that your company has ever experienced.  You aren’t even sure if your group will be able to produce the right amount of chemicals.  This change isn’t completely unwelcomed, however, whenever you have new clients there are always obstacles to overcome.

First and foremost, there is a language barrier, which after hiring a reliable translation service will solve itself.  Second is securing a reliable staging area and shipyard.  One call to your procurement agent will help take that off your plate.  The final item is one of the most important: insuring that you are up to date on the codes and regulations for shipping these chemicals.  We can help you out on the last part: Air Sea Containers is a distributor of International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Manuals.

What is the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code?

Generally speaking the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code or IMDG Code is a set of universal guidelines to ship hazardous or dangerous goods via boat.  These guidelines were created and are enforced to help protect a ship’s crew from whatever chemicals are onboard with them and is oftentimes heard in conjunction with the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL 73/78).  The IMDG Code covers: how to label your chemical drums; a glossary of various terminology; and how to mark your chemicals so then the crewmen understand what contents reside inside the drum; plus much more.  As luck would have it, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code has just been updated to its 37th Edition, which goes into effect on January 1, 2016, with optional compliance currently accepted.

What New Material and Revisions have been Implemented in the 37th Edition of the IMDG Code?

Even though it seems like the most current version of the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code just came out (the 36th Edition of the IMDG Code was dated 2012, however its mandatory implementation date was January of 2014), this revised and updated version has a few new items do discuss and cover.

One of the most important revisions is the implementation of a new revision of IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material – 2012 Edition (IAEA Safety Standards Series SSR-6), which supersedes the IAEA 2009 Edition.  This is most beneficial to shippers and handlers of Class 7 goods.  Another significant change is the addition of two columns (16a and 16b) on the Dangers Goods List (DGL), which incorporates coding for Stowage and Handling (column 16a) as well as Segregation (column 16b) in lieu of descriptions.  Other changes on the DGL include but are not limited to:  asbestos shipping codes; division of the capacitor entry; a series of shipping names for adsorbed gases; and descriptors for safety devices.  In addition to the DGL changes, special provisions have been created for shipping common items.

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Manuals Available in Various Formats

If you are in the business, we know that you will want to have your IMDG Manuals in various formats to accommodate your office’s users.  Because the audience for this specific code is so varied, we can offer you the following formats for your use.

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Downloadable:

If you are in the middle of trying to ship your chemicals out to sea in a hurry, the last thing you want to haul along with you is a large book (or in the 2014 codes it will be two large books) out into the field when you could download them to your tablet.  This makes your manual portable and easy to store in luggage (if you are traveling).

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Hardcover Book:

When you are in a warehouse, you need to have a book that is durable and ready for wear and tear.  An IMDG hardcover manual is perfect to meet these needs.  It won’t get misplaced like paperbacks tend to and it will be readily available for those that are not technically savvy.

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Paperback Book:

If you are in an office environment and you are not and probably will not plan on seeing the staging area and warehouse where your chemicals will be stored, the IMDG paperback book is the perfect choice for you.  You are the paper shuffler that makes sure that each barrel of chemicals is labeled correctly, packed correctly, and shipped correctly.  This is a perfect reference book as you make sure that everything sails smoothly.

 


Promote Safety with IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations Manuals

IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations Manuals

Safety should always be a number one priority when shipping goods. Not only are there strict government regulations that help ensure the safety of everyone who handles your packages, following regulations can also help your employees to feel more secure. IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations are a detailed set of rules that every shipping company needs to follow. Having a proper IATA manual can help you to learn more about these strict regulations and ensure that your operation is always up to code.

IATA DGR Helps Define Aircraft Safety

Not every item needs to be treated equally when it is on an aircraft. Dangerous goods often have very specific handling procedures that your staff needs to be aware of. IATA DGR regulations help you to understand how moving certain items are restricted. You can learn which locations ban certain items or limit them.

The IATA works closely with the United States government to help develop regulations. This helps to ensure that the guidelines are written in a way that is not only effective, but practical as well. The IATA book lists all of these regulations. Each of the IATA regs can be put into practice globally.

Manuals help to serve as a quick reference for those shipping hazmat materials. Hazmat air transportation regulations can be very complex, and it is important to have the information you need on a moment’s notice. Manuals are portable and can be taken anywhere n the job, making them an indispensable tool for your employees.

Make sure you have a intricate understanding of current regulations before attempting to ship dangerous goods. This can help you to save both time and money in the long run.

How Does the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations Book Help You

The IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations book is designed to help your business in a number of ways. Published by the International Air Transport Association, this guide is used by more than 200 airlines. Detailed regulations help you to understand everything related to shipping dangerous goods, from labeling to packing requirements.

Your IATA manual includes information, updated annually, on the following:

  • Proper shipping names
  • Labeling requirements
  • Packaging procedures
  • Training guidelines
  • How to use shipping forms

Purchasing an IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations book helps your business to ensure the safety of everyone who handles your packages. While safety should be your primary concern as a company, there are many other reasons why people are investing in a manual.

The IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations paper book helps your business in several ways:

  • Identify regulations that are relevant to your industry.
  • Ensures you have a good understanding of legal documentations for shipping.
  • Teaches employees how to prepare a shipment.
  • Allows you to better examine your current procedures.
  • Includes information on which commodities cannot be shipped via air.
  • Helps your business avoid penalties and delays due to non-compliant shipping practices.

If your business sends or receives hazardous materials via aircraft on a regular basis, you will need the newest version of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations book. This not only has the potential to improve the efficiency of your business, it also allows you to ensure the safety of your employees and property.

Most Updated IATA Regulations

Like other safety recommendations and regulations, practices will change with time. IATA regulations are examined frequently in order to cover the latest shipping trends. This helps to continue to ensure safety even as materials or common practices change. Having the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations newest information helps you to better anticipate the needs of your business.

Several different manuals for IATA Shipping Regs have been produced. Currently, the 56th edition of DGR is being used, and each copy has introduced significant changes. Resources and tools allow you to stay on top of these changes, including an IATA DG Community. With the help of your manual and the resources that come with it, you will have the education you need to ship goods anywhere in the world.

Manuals for shipping hazmat via air are not limited to a traditional textbook. Multiple versions help you to follow the regulations on a wider range of sites. To get an IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations download, visit Air Sea Containers.

Where to Buy an IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations Paper Book

Purchasing the latest IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations paper book can be easy when you work with a company like Air Sea Containers. Our online store includes several versions of the IATA regulations to help you get the exact set of rules you need to do your job. Our wide selection can easily be shipped to your home or office.

If you are working with a larger employee base, you may want to provide everyone with their own manual. This makes it easier for them to do their jobs without having to worry about sharing. We offer several price breaks when multiple products or copies are purchased. Contact us directly to learn more about how you can save money while providing every employee with the manuals they need.

Your safety and the safety of everyone who handles your merchandise is important. Investing in proper training and an IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations paper book for every employee is the first step in improving shipping efficiency. To learn more about the current regulations or purchase your copy, please visit our website.

 


IMDG Book

The IMDG Code (International Maritime Dangerous Goods) is a uniform international code that deals with the transport of dangerous goods being shipped by seas. The matters it covers are container traffic, storage, and packing. It also has a reference when it comes to the segregation of the incompatible substances. The code is constantly being changed and updated, and it’s good to stay up to date on the IMDG. Air Sea Containers sells the updated version of the book, and it’s available for sale now.

IMDG Book

How the IMDG Regulations Were Made and Updated

The IMDG Code was made in 1960 by the Safety of Life at Sea Conference. The code was made so it could be recommended to governments who can adopt the uniform code when it comes to shipping dangerous goods at sea. The IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee started to prepare the code in 1961. They worked in close cooperation with the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods. Ever since, the code has continued to go through many changes. Amendments that are put forth by the United Nations Recommendations are usually made on a regular two-yearly cycle. Two years after the new amendments are made, the authorities adopt them who are responsible for keeping up with the regulations when it comes to different transport modes.

A basic set of the requirements is applied to modes of transported that are implemented and established. The IMDG Regulations are always going being updated, changed, and some regulations are even re-written. So it’s a good idea to stay up to date with our updated IMO Manuals and IMDG Books.

What IMDG Regulations Have Changed, and When Will They Come into Effect?

For example, there were a few regulations that were updated and revised. These are the Amendment 37-14, and they are optional as of January 1, 2015. They will become mandatory when January 1, 2016 rolls around. So, what are the changes that have come about? Here are the changes.

  • A clarification that lamps and light bulbs are not to be considered dangerous goods
  • Significant revisions to the requirements for Class 7 radioactive substances
  • Addition of shipping descriptions and packaging instructions for adsorbed gases
  • Clarifications on classifying viscous flammable liquids
  • Clarification of the design and dimensions of various marks, such as the marine pollutant and limited quantity markings, as well as the design and dimensions of labels and placards
  • The lettering of the OVERPACK marking must be at least 12 mm high (Mandatory January 1, 2016)

As you can see, it’s very important to stay updated on the latest regulations. Our IMDG Book is constantly updated . It’s there to help our customers to make sure they meet all IMDG and IMO regulations. We also have different options available when it comes to the format of the book itself. We aim to make it as easily accessible as possible for our customers. So, what kind of formats do we have to offer?

Well, for an easy to use the book you can use the IMDG Code paperback book. It’s a good backup reference to having around the office for when you need it. It’s also perfect if you have a lot of employees who need to double check the book when dealing with multiple shipments. Not only will you have peace of mind, but you’ll be one step ahead of the IMO Regulations and IMDG Code. It’s also great for on the go!

What if you’re not looking to use a book though? We also have a hardcover version that will stand the test of time. It’s not quite as portable, but it’s great for travel. So if it falls off a desk or get banged around. You don’t have to worry about the pages from it falling out.

Another option for our customers who like to travel may be our IMDG Code pdf download. This means you can take the code wherever you go! As long as the device supports PDF format, you will always have the IMDG Code on the go! You can bring it up on your smartphone, laptop, or even a tablet! So if you’re unsure if regulations are being met, you can do a quick check yourself just to make sure.

IMO Manuals and IMDG Regulation Books Always Updated

The regulations are always changing, being revised, or updating. This year alone many regulations are optional. On the start of the 2016 year though, these new updates are going to be mandatory. So why not make sure you have the new regulations available as soon as possible? Make sure all your shipments are up to date before the regulations become mandatory. This will make easier for you down the road when you start shipping in the 2016 New Year.

As you can see, we make sure to keep all of our customers updated. At Air Sea Containers, we want to be your one stop shop when it comes to the shipping of your hazardous materials. Not only do we have packaging options and supplies to make sure your dangerous goods are within regulation. We also provide the information so you can stay up to date no matter what. If you need books in different codes, please feel free to contact us at any time. We will help you as best we can, and help to get you what you need!

 


IMDG Code

IMDG codeThe International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) is a guide to the regulations that must be followed when shipping dangerous goods across the seas. The IMDG code involves many complex levels and is undergoing revisions and updates every few years. A new update has just been released, and while the new regulations are just “recommendations” for the time being, the new regulations in the IMDG Code will become mandatory beginning in 2016. It is a great idea to familiarize yourself with all that is new as well as refresh your knowledge of the IMDG Code if you doing any shipping of dangerous goods over the seas.

That is where Air Sea Containers can help you and your business tremendously! With our vast supply of shipping products including vessels, containers, and labels, we also have a well-stocked section of books and publications published by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) which can help you stay informed and up to date on any and all regulations regarding your dangerous goods shipments.

IMO Regulations

When it comes to ocean shipping regulations, the IMO has over 200 publications that can help any business or individual plan and ship dangerous goods with ease and safety. Internationally, the IMO is trusted to guide shippers in making good decisions and meeting the regulations for shipment and safety that must be adhered to when shipping anything that may be dangerous. The newest publication from the IMO is the newest version of the IMDG Code. Some examples of changes this year include: clarification on lamps and light bulbs, major changes to issues involving radioactive materials, clarification in the area of marking packages and substances, and issues involving gasses and flammable liquids.

You don’t want to miss out on the new IMO regulations you must follow to ship your dangerous goods safely and within the requirements of the IMO and international law. Visit the IMO regulations page of Air Sea Containers to order your copy of the new IMDG page now. Don’t wait until these new regulations are required. Inform yourself today while they are still in the recommendation stage so you can plan ahead for 2016 and be ready to ship without any delay. You can find our publications page at www.airseacontainers.com. We also have available emergency guides, shipping guides and many other publications to help you understand how to safely ship your dangerous goods within the recommended guidelines and requirements of the International Maritime Organization.

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code

International Maritime Dangerous Goods CodeAir Sea Containers has the entire International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code on hand in its entirety and with its newest amendments for $199. This includes the entire code with all the changes made for amendment 37 which are now in effect and will become mandatory next year. If you are new to shipping dangerous goods on the seas and oceans, this is a must have publication for you and your business. However, if you only need the newest changes and not the entire code, we have IMDG Code Supplement 37th, Current Addition available for just $90. If you are an established business that is fully aware of your responsibilities and just need the newest information available, this is the publication for you.

However, in addition to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, we have publications that cover every maritime and/or shipping topic imaginable. Whether you are a mariner that works on the water with these dangerous goods daily or you are involved in the industry and provider side on land, you will need to be aware of the codes and regulations that guide the industry as well as safety tips. Air Sea Containers has available publications from the International Maritime Organization that can help guide you on how to package your goods as well as how to label them to meet the industry standards. With several SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea) publications as well, you will learn about regulations regarding all life at sea as well as matters of shipping on the seas. SOLAS has been a convention that has guided safety issues for maritime organizations and merchant vessels since 1914, shortly after the sinking of the Titanic.

They are considered the best of the best when it comes to ensuring the safety of sea going merchants and vessels. We also have publications for how to prevent accidents and catastrophes with the best practices available. Let Air Sea Containers provide you with all you need for ensuring you are safe, meeting regulations, and following international codes and laws for shipping your dangerous goods. We also have publications from MARPOL which will assist you in making sure you are meeting all the requirements in terms of not polluting our seas. As you can see, at Air Sea Containers our book section has everything you need to be a competent and compliant businessperson when it comes to shipping dangerous goods.

When you are up to date on all your requirements to ship your dangerous goods using the IMDG Code, let Air Sea Containers help you ship your goods. We have a wide variety of shipping containers, boxes, liners, packaging, absorbers, labels, and declaration materials to make your job as a shipper of dangerous goods much easier. We are here to help you in all that you do. You can trust Air Sea Containers to supply you with the best in both information and supplies.

 


International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG), an Update

Some of our world-wide maritime transported goods are relied upon the decision and choices of national and international companies. These companies’ employees must abide by rules and regulations of the IMO or International Maritime Organization Codes. The development of the IMDG Code began back in the 1960 Safety of Life at Sea Conference. It was recommended that bodies of  Governments should “adopt a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea to supplement the regulations contained in the 1960 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).” Hence, the IMDG Code book was created because of this.

According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the revision of the published International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG), now known as Amendment 37-14, will be optional to comply with starting on January 1, 2015. Although, it will become mandatory on January 1, 2016; the current 2014 manual is available, and but consumers can pre-order the upcoming 2015 revision with us, Air Sea Containers in our books section.

The International maritime dangerous goods code (IMDG) book includes a 2 Volume Set with the IMDG Code being accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea. It is recommended to governments for adoption or for use as the basis for national regulations. It is intended for use not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping, and contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action. It comes in paperback, bound, and hardcover or with the CD/combo kit.

Significant change to the IMDG Book

Some of the amendments to the IMDG Code originated from sources such as proposals submitted directly to IMO by Member States. Plus, amendments required to take account of changes to the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods which sets the basic requirements for all the transport modes. This is a very good reason why you should pre-order your book.  The international maritime dangerous goods code updated version will consist of significant revisions to the requirements for Class 7 radioactive substances, for instance.  Also the addition of shipping descriptions and packaging instructions for absorbed gases.  Some other notable clarifications to expect in the new revision of the IMDG book will be the clarifying of viscous flammable liquids. Plus the lettering of the OVERPACK marking or labeling which must have a specific dimension of at least 12 mm high, (mandatory in January 1, 2016) a part of the clarification on the design and dimensions of various marks, such as the marine pollutants and limited quantity markings. More changes in the design and dimensions of labels and placards.  Plus, lamps and light bulbs are not considered goods either. The dangerous goods list in chapter 3.2 will be updated as well. A number of revisions to shipping descriptions is an important revision that will be looked at more notably to those in the sea/air transporting services.  For one, those in the auto industry, which have shipping names AIR BAG MODULES, AIR BAG INFLATORS and SEAT-BELT PRETENSIONERS will be changed to SAFETY DEVICES, under the UN number 3268. These plus other changes include.

The IMDG Code Book Industries and Services

International maritime dangerous goods codeInternational maritime dangerous goods code such as the IMDG Code 2014 (Current Edition) is accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea and is recommended to governments for adoption or for use as the basis for national regulations. It is intended for use not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping, and contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action.

These books are accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea and for those which services are connected with shipping. You will receive plenty of advice on “terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action.”

What’s being Transported: the Book that will – IMDG.

Most of the contents in the manual or book will illustrate the clarifications of hazardous goods being transported by sea such as explosives, combustibles, articles and substances that may display a significant amount of hazard, plus, toxic gases, flammables, marine pollutants and wastes. Even more, dangerous goods transported by sea such as oxidizing and organic peroxides. And so, by preordering  your updated version of the IMDG book will keep you secured to know that we here at Air Sea Containers will have one or as many as you need at the right time that you need it; Safety first.

Transporting Dangerous Goods: What are Dangerous Goods?

Finally, what you will learn from this book is to be able to identify the “dangerous good” definition such as “what is considered to be” a dangerous good. Also, ensuring what documentation is completed correctly. Also, making sure you have all documentation needed for your “dangerous goods” being transported by sea. Plus, one of the most important aspects of transporting is how to prepare a shipment that includes dangerous goods, and be able to learn the proper preparation for maritime transporting and what commodities can or cannot aboard ship or carrier.

In addition to the IMDG books, make sure your shipments arrive safely and on time. *For large quantity orders please call (305) 599-9123 or email sales@www.airseacontainers.com for price breaks.

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Let us deliver your International Maritime Dangerous Goods book to you…same day, contact us by ph: 305-599-9123, Air Sea Containers, 1850 NW 94th Ave., Miami, FL 33172

 

 

 


What is the International maritime dangerous goods code?

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG) is an internationally recognized set of rules or code addapted to help safely regulate and control the transportation of dangerous goods. Each country and or state has its own ideas about what is and what is not safe, so this was implemented in or around 1960 to make detailed clarifications to easily adjust to different areas. This code allows for us to have a universal idea of what and what not to ship to help regulate rules and regulations for each place a ship travels carrying such goods. You can learn more about this in the International maritime dangerous goods pdf download available to you on our website.

Changes to The International Maritime Dangerous Good Code.

There are changes that are coming at the start of our New Year to the International Maritimes dangerous goods code, (IMDG) that you need to watch for so you are better informed to the new rules and regulations. The new changes will become mandatory in 2016 giving you time to adjust slowly and accurately to the changes that are coming.

Lamps and Light bulb Amendment in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code

One code that is changing and will not be mandatory until January 2016 is lamps and light bulbs will no longer be considered dangerous goods. This regulation change is fairly straight forward. Lamps and light bulbs can carry mercury which makes then hazards waste and unsafe to ship regularly. When disposing of lamps or light bulbs be sure and check out what the proper way to do so is to maintain waste and recycling of hazardous goods. You can learn more about these changes in the International maritime dangerous goods pdf download.

Class Seven Radioactive Substances.

There are changes coming to the Class Seven Radioactive substances that will be significantly revised. You will be able to get full details in the International maritime dangerous goods pdf download available on our website. All changes and revisions being made are for r safety and the safety of others. They will pertain to things such as the number of packages transported containing radioactive substance at one time. There will also be changes in the amount of radioactive substances that can be stored at a set location. There will be revisions on how close packages containing radioactive substance can be in conjunction with living things such as passengers or animals. This revision will also include other substances or objects that react negatively with radioactive substances being shipped.

Clarification of Classifying Vicious Flammable Liquids

A flammable liquid is any liquid that has a flash point or above of one hundred degrees (100 degrees) or above also known as Thirty-seven point eight degrees Celsius, (37.8 degrees C). The two current classifications for flammable liquids are Class two liquids and Class three liquids. Class two liquids is any liquid between flash point of 100 degrees Fahrenheit and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, minus any fixture having flash points of 200 degrees. Class three is 140 degrees and above which is also divided into two subsections to better clarify this category and what is and is not okay. The subdivisions are class three A and Class Three B. You can find more detail and better understanding in our International maritime dangerous goods pdf that you can download off our website.

A number of other changes to make note of

There will be a number of other changes you will want to make note of in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods PDF download to get use to as we approach a new year. Various changes listed will be in the shipping instructions. There will be changes to the automotive area of the regulations. Also be sure and check out changes in sizing of letters for the overpack labels. Paint related materials are receiving an overhaul along with combustion engine and fuel cell engines. Each of these changes that are coming needs to be read, and understood to make sure your shipments go through without being returned to you. You can find deeper detail, instructions and clarifications in the International maritime dangerous goods pdf download on our website.

How do I find the downloads that I need?

Previously stated above there is a one year transitional period that you can take note of when adjusting to the new amendments and clarifications to help you adhere in a more uniformed way. To find the International maritime dangerous goods pdf Download which will offer you the information you need to know for our upcoming year, look to the left side bar. At the very bottom of the side bar you will see a section marked downloads. When you click on downloads a drop down of available downloads will appear. You can pick the area based on a particular need you have such as, packing instructions or certifications. There is an option to pick “All Downloads” To search for anything you think you might be missing or are unaware of. Or you can simply download the various catalogs we have available to you with detailed information you will need to ship Dangerous goods. Please keep in mind that you will need to fill out the form at the bottom of the page so all downloads are at your reach. If you are struggling feel free to contact us at your convince so we can better assist you with your needs. For specific needs on the International Maritime dangerous goods changes and regulations you can download the “International Maritime Dangerous Goods Download located in the download section.

 


The IMO Dangerous Goods Code

Read All About the 2015 Changes to the IMDG Regulations

Ever since the International Maritime Organization (IMO) approved the initial IMO Dangerous Goods Code, (IMDG), the rules have been consistently updated to reflect new and improved practices regarding the transportation of dangerous goods. The code was a result of the IMO’s decisions to institute a set of international regulations detailing the proper and safe ways to transport dangerous cargo by sea. Many of the changes were orchestrated to keep pace with the changes in the affected industries, but the core principles and intentions of the IMDG regulations have remained the same. The code was made mandatory in 2004, but nearly all international shippers abided by the regulations set down in the previous editions of the codes for the past several decades. There are still certain sections of the code that are merely recommendations, but even they are subject to future revisions, with the possibility that they too will eventually be requirements.

In broad terms, the code breaks down dangerous goods into many different classes. The classes are grouped by the similarity of the items in the class. Each class has its own rules for how items are to be labeled, packaged, and transported. Often, when the code has been amended, the whole code does not change; rather, specific sections of the code are addressed to update shipping practices of various classes of dangerous goods.

By the end of 2014, the IMO will publish the next revision of the IMDG regulations, and organizations should start getting familiar with them as soon as they can. The new IMDG Code amendments will be optional starting on the first day of January 2015, but they will become mandatory on January first of 2016. IMO regulations such as the IMDG Code can be complicated and difficult to skim through in a short amount of time, but affected companies can get their hands on them as soon as the changes are made in whatever format they choose, as the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code paperback and hardcover books will be available once the new regulations are finalized, and they can also be purchased and downloaded as a pdf file. The sooner the new changes are understood, the easier it will be to comply with them.

The New IMDG Code

The new edition of the IMDG Code is not expected to feature a tremendous number of changes, at least when compared to some of the previous amendments. However, many of the issues that are addressed are expected to be of significant importance. There will be clarifications on several issues such as whether lamps and light bulbs are to be considered dangerous cargo or not, the classification of viscous liquids that are flammable, and new input on size and appearance of various markings, labels, and notices including markings that reference limited quantities of items or whether an item is a marine pollutant. There are also expected to be major changes made to the requirements for radioactive substances and extra shipping information about how to package adsorbed gases.

Another change to the IMDG Code will involve the separation of the Dangerous Goods List into separate categories. Stowage and Segregation will now be featured as columns 16a and 16b, respectively. New codes will be assigned for various types of cargo depending on how they fit in these columns. In the same vein, many new revisions are expected on the topic of shipping descriptions, particularly for items pertaining to the automotive industry (many of the formerly separate categories will be combined into a new category known as Safety Devices). Other products will have changes regarding the way they are to be labeled for shipping to better indicate the contents of a given container. Some of the descriptions will create new higher level categories designed to capture more products underneath a large umbrella of cargo, whereas others will have new subcategories added to allow for more descriptive labels to be put on a product during packaging and shipping.

The new IMDG Code will also feature a number of new special provisions. These provisions will include items that clarify the uses of particular shipping names for product categories, standards for items that feature pressure release devices, and procedures for transporting and protecting neutron radiation detectors. Additionally, some existing special provisions are expected to receive modifications to their language. One change that will be forthcoming will involve Special Provision 961, which pertains to many types of internal combustion and fuel cell powered engines.

Where to Find the IMDG Code

Although the changes in the new amendment of the IMDG regulations will not be mandatory until the beginning of 2016, they will go into effect at the start of 2015, and shippers and carriers are expected to treat 2015 as a transition period to learn and adapt to the revisions to the code instead of delaying adoption of the new rules until the last possible moment. Implementing new practices and adjusting existing routines to fit the regulations as soon as possible will benefit everyone, as cargo will be transported more safely and effectively, and shipments will be able to depart and arrive on schedule and without incident.

Of course, in order to know what the new revisions are in full, they need to be read, and it probably behooves all shippers to have a copy or two on hand for reference. The easiest place to find the IMDG Code is the IMO Publication Section on their website. There, buyers have their choice of purchasing the IMDG Code paperback or hardcover books, or purchasing the pdf version and downloading it. The code can also be found at www.imdgcodesupport.com in formats that are supported by Windows or on the web. Finally, the International Code Council (ICC) Compliance Center also can be contacted with any questions about the shipping practices for a particular class of dangerous goods or with questions about the upcoming revisions to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (both before and after the new revisions are published).


International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code

Upcoming changes to The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code

Download the Book and Say Up To Date

what you need to know about imdg code 2012 36th-amendment

The International Maritime Organization has made our lives a little easier with their revisions to the International Maritime Goods Code. First, we have to learn a little more about what the new revisions to IMO regulations entail. You can start implementing Amendment 37-14 January 1, 2015 or if you’d like more time to practice, you have until January 1, 2016 before it becomes mandatory. Either way, you will need a guide to help ease you through Amendment 37-14 into full, comfortable application. Lucky for you, the revised International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is available in any format you prefer. You can either download the IMDG Code online, in PDF format, order a paperback book or order your own hardcover book to keep.

What Are IMO Regulations?

Before we get into the new IMO regulations, you may want to know more about the IMO itself. In 1960, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code was developed by the Safety of Life at Sea Conference. The Safety of Life at Sea Conference suggested that a uniform international code ought to be developed for the transport of dangerous goods by sea. This code would cover packing technique, container traffic and container stowage, as well as special attention to separating substances that are incompatible. A Maritime Safety Committee was appointed where they developed an international code in 1961. The committee collaborated with the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Good who, in 1956, had implemented minimum requirements for the transport of dangerous goods in any means of transport.

2015 is not the first time changes have been made. In fact, since the fourth IMO Assembly adopted the code in 1956, the IMDG Code has experienced many revisions in order to attend to the volatile needs of the industry. Amendments are made every two years and made effective two years after that.

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is broken up into classes. As you will find in International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code Paperback Book, provisions for each class or division are mapped out for your comprehension. If you would like to know more about a specific dangerous good, each product can be found in the Dangerous Goods List which includes the goods requirements and class. Substances (which include solutions and mixtures) have nine classes total, some with subdivisions. The classes are based on the hazard they present. Quite a few of these substances are considered marine pollutants.

 

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code 2014 Edition

When changes are made, it can be a struggle to get back into a routine. The key to success is knowing exactly what to expect. In order to fully comprehend the new IMO regulations, you must acquire the new IMDG book. Until then, here is a short synopsis of the upcoming changes and what you can do to easily implement them.

Lucky for us, the 2015 revisions don’t have quite as many revisions as the past. There are six major revisions in all and none of them are mandatory until 2016. The first revision is that lamps and light bulbs will no longer be considered dangerous goods. Secondly, Class 7 radioactive substances have undergone significant revisions. Additions have been made to shipping descriptions and packaging instructions for adsorbed gases. Classifying viscous flammable liquids has undergone deeper clarification as well as the design and dimensions of marks including marine pollutant and quantity markings. Lastly, the lettering of the mark OVERPACK must be 12 mm high.

In Chapter 3.2 of the Dangerous Goods List, column 16 (Stowage and segregation) will be divided into two. The end result will be column 16a, stowage and column 16b, segregation. If you need the appropriate codes for storage and segregation, they will be assigned within each shipping description (which can be found in Chapter 7.2).

As for shipping descriptions, there are plenty of revisions to go over. The most important one is to do with the automotive industry which changes the names of Airbag Modules, Airbag Inflators and Seat-Belt Pretensioners to Safety Devices. As for IMO regulations, the 2015 revisions include asbestos now being shipped under the names Asbestos, Amphibole and Asbestos, Chrysotile. The Capacitors shipping description will be split into Capacitor, Electric Double Layer (UN3499) and Capacitor, Asymmetric (UN3508). Packing Discarded, Empty, Unclean, UN3509 has a new entry. The entry doesn’t apply for any normal sea shipments just so long as the packaging has been prepared for transport. If you need more details as to what the requirements for transport are, refer to section 4.1.1.11. Finally, new shipping names will be assigned to various adsorbed gases from UN3510 to UN3526.

New special provisions have been designed as well. These provisions include special provision 367 which regulates the use of shipping names for paint related materials in shipments that contain paint and paint thinners. In special provision 371, standards will apply to small pressure receptacles with a release device. Special provision 373 further clarifies procedures for shipping neutron radiation detectors which contain non-pressurized boron trifluoride gas. Then, wrapping up the current special provisions, clarifications were designed to the exempted internal combustion engines, fuel cell engines and vehicles with battery powered equipment special provisions 961 and to the non-exempted international combustion engines, fuel cell engines, vehicles and battery-powered equipment special provisions 962.

Even though changes in the IMDG Amendment 37-14 don’t take place right away, any shippers and carriers should take advantage of this transition time so that shipments arrive safely and without interruption.

IMDG Code Publications is currently manufacturing and distributing the IMO IMDG Code 2014 Edition with the amendments 37-14. The newest IMDG Code is a two-volume set and IMDG Code Publications has made available a one-volume supplement that goes into greater detail on techniques to deal with fires and spillage emergencies. The 2014 IMO IMDG code have been published in both English and French, with the English edition available in an electronic PDF download. Download yours today!