International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG), an Update

Some of our world-wide maritime transported goods are relied upon the decision and choices of national and international companies. These companies’ employees must abide by rules and regulations of the IMO or International Maritime Organization Codes. The development of the IMDG Code began back in the 1960 Safety of Life at Sea Conference. It was recommended that bodies of  Governments should “adopt a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea to supplement the regulations contained in the 1960 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).” Hence, the IMDG Code book was created because of this.

According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the revision of the published International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG), now known as Amendment 37-14, will be optional to comply with starting on January 1, 2015. Although, it will become mandatory on January 1, 2016; the current 2014 manual is available, and but consumers can pre-order the upcoming 2015 revision with us, Air Sea Containers in our books section.

The International maritime dangerous goods code (IMDG) book includes a 2 Volume Set with the IMDG Code being accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea. It is recommended to governments for adoption or for use as the basis for national regulations. It is intended for use not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping, and contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action. It comes in paperback, bound, and hardcover or with the CD/combo kit.

Significant change to the IMDG Book

Some of the amendments to the IMDG Code originated from sources such as proposals submitted directly to IMO by Member States. Plus, amendments required to take account of changes to the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods which sets the basic requirements for all the transport modes. This is a very good reason why you should pre-order your book.  The international maritime dangerous goods code updated version will consist of significant revisions to the requirements for Class 7 radioactive substances, for instance.  Also the addition of shipping descriptions and packaging instructions for absorbed gases.  Some other notable clarifications to expect in the new revision of the IMDG book will be the clarifying of viscous flammable liquids. Plus the lettering of the OVERPACK marking or labeling which must have a specific dimension of at least 12 mm high, (mandatory in January 1, 2016) a part of the clarification on the design and dimensions of various marks, such as the marine pollutants and limited quantity markings. More changes in the design and dimensions of labels and placards.  Plus, lamps and light bulbs are not considered goods either. The dangerous goods list in chapter 3.2 will be updated as well. A number of revisions to shipping descriptions is an important revision that will be looked at more notably to those in the sea/air transporting services.  For one, those in the auto industry, which have shipping names AIR BAG MODULES, AIR BAG INFLATORS and SEAT-BELT PRETENSIONERS will be changed to SAFETY DEVICES, under the UN number 3268. These plus other changes include.

The IMDG Code Book Industries and Services

International maritime dangerous goods codeInternational maritime dangerous goods code such as the IMDG Code 2014 (Current Edition) is accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea and is recommended to governments for adoption or for use as the basis for national regulations. It is intended for use not only by the mariner but also by all those involved in industries and services connected with shipping, and contains advice on terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action.

These books are accepted as an international guide to the transport of dangerous goods by sea and for those which services are connected with shipping. You will receive plenty of advice on “terminology, packaging, labeling, placarding, markings, stowage, segregation, handling, and emergency response action.”

What’s being Transported: the Book that will – IMDG.

Most of the contents in the manual or book will illustrate the clarifications of hazardous goods being transported by sea such as explosives, combustibles, articles and substances that may display a significant amount of hazard, plus, toxic gases, flammables, marine pollutants and wastes. Even more, dangerous goods transported by sea such as oxidizing and organic peroxides. And so, by preordering  your updated version of the IMDG book will keep you secured to know that we here at Air Sea Containers will have one or as many as you need at the right time that you need it; Safety first.

Transporting Dangerous Goods: What are Dangerous Goods?

Finally, what you will learn from this book is to be able to identify the “dangerous good” definition such as “what is considered to be” a dangerous good. Also, ensuring what documentation is completed correctly. Also, making sure you have all documentation needed for your “dangerous goods” being transported by sea. Plus, one of the most important aspects of transporting is how to prepare a shipment that includes dangerous goods, and be able to learn the proper preparation for maritime transporting and what commodities can or cannot aboard ship or carrier.

In addition to the IMDG books, make sure your shipments arrive safely and on time. *For large quantity orders please call (305) 599-9123 or email sales@www.airseacontainers.com for price breaks.

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Let us deliver your International Maritime Dangerous Goods book to you…same day, contact us by ph: 305-599-9123, Air Sea Containers, 1850 NW 94th Ave., Miami, FL 33172

 

 

 

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